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BAE extends HybriDrive system to trucks

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December 23, 2010

BAE is developing a parallel version of its HybriDrive system for medium and heavy-duty tr...

BAE is developing a parallel version of its HybriDrive system for medium and heavy-duty trucks

The HybriDrive series propulsion system developed by BAE Systems is currently enhancing the fuel efficiency and cutting emissions on more than 3,000 transit buses in cities around the world, including New York and London. The system is specifically suited to the driving patterns of urban transport, which involve low average speeds and frequent stopping and starting. To meet the needs of applications that have higher operating speeds and less frequent stops, BAE is developing a new parallel hybrid propulsion system to bring the fuel-saving benefits of its technology to medium and heavy-duty trucks.

HybriDrive series propulsion is a diesel-electric system that consists of a generator, an electric motor, and a lithium-ion battery energy storage system that is managed by computerized controls. The diesel engine that turns the generator operates independently of the electric motor, which allows it to run at a nearly constant speed for optimum efficiency. Since the electric motor is what makes the wheels turn, the vehicle also accelerates smoothly with no sudden jerks. Additionally, during braking the electric motor acts as a generator to recapture energy that is stored in the batteries.

While the series propulsion system doesn’t use a transmission – cutting down on maintenance costs – the HybriDrive parallel system integrates a single electric machine between the engine and the transmission. BAE says the system is easy to install and enhances propulsion and lowers fuel consumption and emissions by optimizing the blending of the internal combustion engine power and electric power.

"The development of a parallel system is part of our strategy to broaden our HybriDrive product family to meet the growing worldwide need for more efficient transport and energy management," said Steve Trichka, vice president of power and energy management for BAE Systems. “HybriDrive power is green power, and our new parallel system addresses the need for more efficient, cleaner, medium and heavy duty transport of goods and people around the world," he added.

BAE Systems says the HybriDrive parallel system is in the final stages of development with the first road trial slated for around Q2 2011, ahead of an expected deployment of the system in 2012.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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5 Comments

"HybriDrive series propulsion is a diesel-electric system that consists of a generator, an electric motor, and a lithium-ion battery energy storage system that is managed by computerized controls. The diesel engine that turns the generator operates independently of the electric motor, which allows it to run at a nearly constant speed for optimum efficiency."

Isn't this almost the same as the GM Volt system except the volt uses a petrol motor? Please let me know if I am mistaken.

It is a good idea to improve fuel efficiency for city driving but I still am concerned about diesel emissions in large cities.

Adrian Akau
23rd December, 2010 @ 07:04 pm PST

You are right, but the Volt was only planned to be built like this. This system is often called Petrol-electric or Diesel-Electric, and all diesel locomotives use the same principle.

I find it quite weird that it took 40 years to reinvent it....

However, the Volt turned out to be 'just' a full hybrid as the others.

Fabian Fanton
24th December, 2010 @ 06:16 am PST

This hybrid idea has been around since the 1950's. I saw it in Popular Mechanics.With regard to diesel admissions, it is much better to try and trap the carbon particles(maybe centrifugally) than it is to try and complete the combustion cycle and convert carbon into carbon dioxide. I wonder whether small gas turbine generators could be considered? I imagine they can run on any type of fuel.

windykites1
24th December, 2010 @ 06:34 am PST

Kenworth Truck Manufacturing had a pair of Hybrid semi's on the road twenty odd years ago . A buick V6 3.8 ltr engine ran a generator that powered the electric drive wheels . KW let this system die out . We invent then send/sell the information to other countries to build .

Econo Guy
4th January, 2011 @ 11:44 am PST

Another application of Hybrid Vehicles.

Dr.a.Jagadeesh Nellore(AP),India

Anumakonda Jagadeesh
3rd February, 2011 @ 02:29 am PST
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