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Babyglow color-changing suit tells you when baby is ill

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June 22, 2009

The Babyglow baby suit will instantly alert you that your baby has a high temperature

The Babyglow baby suit will instantly alert you that your baby has a high temperature

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Usually, when a young baby cries, the cause is one of three things. They are hungry, tired or need their diaper changed. When it’s not one of these problems causing the tears, it may mean they are not well. This new invention might help parents immediately recognize that their child has a high temperature - the Babyglow baby suit is designed to change color when your baby’s temperature rises to a dangerous level.

The Babyglow baby suit has been years in the making. UK inventor and parent, Chris Ebejer, had the idea for the suit after watching a documentary about babies. He set about searching for an ink pigment with heat-sensitive molecules. He then spent six years and over GBP 700,000 (approx. USD 1.15million) working with scientists to embed the pigment into cotton baby suits.

The Babyglow baby suits come in pastel green, blue and pink. When your child’s temperature rises above 37C (98.6F), the suit turns white, instantly alerting you that they are too hot.

Ebejer has just signed a GBP 12.5million contract (approx. USD 20.5million) to introduce his Babyglow suits to the world. He has negotiated sales deals in a number of countries, including the USA.

Speaking to Dailymail.co.uk, Ebejer said, "It has taken over my life but I'm very passionate about it. I believe that this is a product that will save lives."

The Babyglow suits go on sale in the UK this October and will retail for GBP 20 (approx. USD $33 at time of publication).

High temperatures are very dangerous for young babies and need immediate attention. Until the Babyglow suits are available, parents could use a thermometer designed specifically for babies, such as the pacifier thermometer. They can also ensure the temperature of the nursery is kept at a safe level by using a room thermometer.

Via The Daily Mail.

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