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Tannith Cattermole

— Outdoors

BioLite low-emission camping stove creates its own electricity

Consider the humble camping stove. It requires fuel - perhaps some unwieldy bottle that air carriers object strongly to. Maybe it needs batteries to run a fan, or billows out smoke so you smell like smoked sweatshirt for the rest of the trip. The solution might be the BioLite stove - it's a collapsible wood-burning cook stove that uses almost any forest-found fuel and converts its own heat energy into electricity to achieve efficient combustion with ultra-low emissions. Read More
— Aircraft

Flying Boat up for auction: Curtiss MF Seagull

By - March 25, 2010 6 Pictures
Putting aside ugly flying cars, no one should fail to be moved by the gorgeous warm-colored wood, hammered copper trims and time-worn patina of this gorgeous piece of antiquity. One of the last known Curtiss MF Seagull Flying Boats is to be sold at auction on Tuesday April 13 at Bonhams in New York. Rich in history, this beautiful vintage sea plane was designed and created by engineer and aviator Glenn H. Curtiss, otherwise known as "the Father of Naval Aviation." Read More
— Aircraft

First flying car goes under the hammer

By - March 25, 2010 3 Pictures
Putting aside jet packs, the other science fiction dream to perpetually elude us is the flying car. Gizmag is littered with stories on flying car inventions and yet my Toyota Camry is mournfully clipped, fused to the road while my dreams of zooming to work in the 21st century remain unrealized. But this is not a story about a new-fangled invention, this is a story about the pioneering forerunner to these zippy young upstarts; the ancient grandfather of flying automobiles, Frank Skroback's Flying Car, which recently went to auction in Atlanta, Georgia. Read More
— Music

The cardboard record player

By - March 22, 2010 1 Picture
A cardboard record player created as a mail promotion has become a chart-topping success for Vancouver-based sound design company GGRP. The six inch record in a corrugated cardboard mailer sleeve folds into a make-shift, human-powered player which, when turned using a pencil, transmits vibrations through the needle and amplifies via cardboard corrugations. Read More
— Science

Silicon computer chips successfully implanted in living human cells

By - March 21, 2010 1 Picture
Scientists have begun integrating electronics into biology, but don't bolt your doors in fear of cyborgs and hybrid human-robots yet! Researchers from the Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona IMB-CNM (CSIC), have found a way to implant minute silicon chips into living cells and use them as intracellular sensors. This bio-nanotechnological advancement could tell us a lot about how our cells are working at a nano level, and have widespread implications for early detection of diseases, and new cellular repair mechanisms. Read More

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