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Simon Crisp

Simon Crisp
Simon is a journalist and photographer who has spent the last ten years working for national UK newspapers - but has never hacked a mobile phone - and specializes in writing about weird products and photography technology. When not writing for Gizmag, Simon is often found playing with LEGO and drinking far too much coffee.
Lomography has announced its latest Art-series lens which brings the original optics of the iconic Lomo LC-A camera to interchangeable lens cameras. The LC-A Minitar-1 Art is a 32-mm F2.8 lens which uses a Leica M mount, meaning it can be used by a wide array of analog and digital cameras with an adapter, and is said to deliver classic LC-A style images with vivid colors and signature vignetting. Read More
Following hot-on-the-heels of the Garmin Virb X and XE, the TomTom Bandit is the latest action camera from a firm best-known for its GPS devices which aims to do something different to GoPro through the use of built-in sensors. In addition to recording data which can be presented visually in videos, the Bandit automatically tags action-packed moments and makes it easy to compile them in videos with an automatic "shake to edit" function. Read More
Ricoh has taken the wraps off its latest flagship Pentax DSLR, the K-3 II. As we've grown to expect from high-end Pentax K-series offerings, the new camera features a sturdy weather resistant body paired with some impressive specs. This time around that includes an enhanced shake reduction system, and the ability to shoot images with full RGB color information for each pixel using a new sensor-shifting Pixel Shift Resolution mode. Read More
Garmin has announced two new action cameras which it hopes can de-throne GoPro with the addition of more action data. The new Virb X and Virb XE models boast a new more GoPro-like form-factor, and come in standard and high-end versions like the Hero4 Silver and Black cameras. However, the new cameras are waterproof without the need for an external case, and are packed with sensors which allow users to display data overlays on their action videos. Read More
Panasonic has revealed its latest action camera in the form of the compact and wearable HX-A1. Decidedly less quirky than the 4K-toting HX-A500 it launched last year, the new model does away with the cable-connected screen and recording unit in favor of a self-contained cylindrical device. The tough compact body houses everything it needs to record Full HD point-of-view footage. Read More
Sony has updated its line-up of point-and-shoot cameras with three new super-zoom models, including two which feature a pop-up OLED viewfinder and lens control rings. The HX90, HX90V and WX500 all use the same 18-megapixel sensor, 30x zoom lens and BIONZ X image processor, but there are a number of important distinguishing features between the cameras. Read More
Footage from live events could soon become more immersive and extreme after GoPro announced the launch of its HeroCast micro transmitter. The new system will make it easier for broadcasters to incorporate GoPro footage into live productions, enabling them to offer viewers unique perspectives of that death-defying stunt or bone-crunching tackle as it happens. Read More
Olympus has announced the latest addition to its line of rugged compact cameras, with the Stylus Tough TG-4. Along with the usual tough credentials which can see the camera submerged in water, dropped, or used in freezing cold temperatures, the new shooter brings photographer-pleasing RAW file support for better image post-processing potential. Also announced by Olympus is the wider availability of the previously Japan-only Stylus 1s high-end compact camera. Read More
Canon has revealed two new professional 4K-toting cameras in the form of the C300 Mark II and the XC10. The EOS C300 M2 is designed for film makers and broadcast producers with its Super 35-mm CMOS sensor and internal 4K recording, while the XC10 is a smaller hybrid camera with a built-in 27-273-mm equivalent lens aimed at indie film makers and multimedia journalists. Read More
With the almost inevitable rise of smartwatches (which still hasn't quite hit the mainstream), the humble fitness tracker could soon have a hard time justifying its demands on your wrist real-estate. As such, they too are getter smarter. While tracking your fitness and activity, the Garmin Vivosmart can also show incoming emails on your wrist and control the music playback of your smartphone. But is a smart(er) fitness tracker a smart buy? Gizmag recently spent a bit of time with one on our wrist to find out. Read More
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