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Richard Moss

Richard Moss
Richard is a freelance writer and journalist based in Melbourne, Australia. He’s contributed to Ars Technica, Edge Magazine, Polygon, and many other publications. When not writing or trying to read the entire internet, you’ll likely find him dancing, playing games, dabbling in creative stuff, or learning about whatever catches his eye.
Top Articles by Richard Moss
  • Scientists create water splitter that runs on a single AAA battery

    A new emissions-free device created by scientists at Stanford University uses an ordinary 1.5-volt battery to split water into hydrogen and oxygen at room temperature, potentially providing a low-cost method to power fuel cells in zero-emissions vehi...

  • New "invisibility cloak" keeps objects from being felt

    Scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have developed a method of concealing objects from the sensation of touch that would finally meet the exacting standards of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale princess, who felt a single pea prodding ...

  • Low-power laser triggers stem cells to repair teeth

    New research into tooth repair and stem cell biology may bring tissue and bone regeneration one step closer to reality – or at the very least, give us hope that we can throw away those nasty dentures.

  • Zero Latency creates a free-roaming wireless multiplayer VR experience

    "Virtual reality needs its arcade moment," argues Zero Latency co-founder Tim Ruse. The Oculus Rift and Project Morpheus headsets may be set to dominate your living room, but the Melbourne-based startup is aiming bigger – offering full immersion with...

  • KOR-FX haptic vest brings games closer to your chest

    That pounding in your chest when the action gets intense in a video game or movie takes on a new dimension with the KOR-FX 4DFX, a lightweight vest that translates audio into subtle vibrations that are meant to help you feel where explosions and guns...

Researchers at Rice University have developed an image sensor that integrates light amplif...

Researchers at Rice University's Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP) have developed a new image sensor that mimics the way we see color by integrating light amplifiers and color filters directly onto the pixels. The new design enables smaller, less complex, and more organic designs for CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) sensors and other photodetectors used in cameras.  Read More

The Stanford University water splitter could save hydrogen producers billions of dollars (...

A new emissions-free device created by scientists at Stanford University uses an ordinary 1.5-volt battery to split water into hydrogen and oxygen at room temperature, potentially providing a low-cost method to power fuel cells in zero-emissions vehicles and buildings.  Read More

Robots and space technology may soon be saving children's lives thanks to KidsArm, a robot...

The technology that built (and continues to maintain) the International Space Station can now be used to help heal sick children. KidsArm, a robotic arm designed for delicate pediatric surgery, was built by the same companies that are behind the robotic arms used by astronauts to construct the ISS.  Read More

A new gene editing technique shows promise for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystroph...

Researchers at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center have developed a technique that corrects a mutation leading to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The technique, called CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, removes the mutation entirely in mice, and could have far-reaching consequences in the treatment of muscular dystrophy in people.  Read More

The Blacksmith Genesis all-in-one 3D printer, scanner, and copier boasts a compact size an...

3D printing may be one of the few technologies that actually holds a solid claim to the over-used adjectives "disruptive" and "world-changing," but its bulky hardware and complicated operation still largely limits its appeal to a market of enthusiasts and experts. Blacksmith, a startup from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, hopes to give 3D printing more mass market appeal with the Blacksmith Genesisa, a new all-in-one 3D printer, scanner, and copier that handles all of the tedious and tricky parts of the process for you.  Read More

Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon are developing a programming language that seamless...

The web would be a much more secure place if not for the vulnerability built right into a common coding practice: pasted-together strings of database commands (usually for either SQL queries or JavaScript-enabled user interactions), which could be exploited for malicious purposes. But computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon are developing a programming language specifically intended to protect computers and websites from such threats.  Read More

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a method for large-scale 3D motion ...

It might soon be possible to perform large-scale 3D motion reconstructions of sporting events or other live performances, thanks to new research by scientists at Carnegie Mellon University. The researchers mounted 480 video cameras in a two-story geodesic dome that enabled them to track the motion of events such as a man swinging a baseball bat or confetti being thrown into the air.  Read More

The Glowbelt is a retractable, one-size-fits-all belt covered in 13 micro LEDs to make its...

It can be scary and more than a little perilous to be on the roads at night if you're not in a car, with being visible the first step to avoiding an accident. Even if you wear light colors, many drivers may not see you until it's too late. Such concerns about road safety drove UK-based design house BMC Innovations to create the Glowbelt, a self-retracting one-size-fits-all belt covered in enough LEDs to make you both highly visible in the black of night and well-dressed for a rave.  Read More

A fine-dust sensor that attaches to your smartphone could help you – and everyone else – m...

Fine dust pollution triggers all manner of health problems, but accurately tracking its concentration across cities and regions takes considerable manpower. That could get a whole lot easier with a sensor that attaches to a smartphone and measures particulate matter (fine dust) levels in the air, which is under development at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.  Read More

Swedish design firm Love Hultén's R-Kaid-R is an elegant retro arcade that you can fold up...

The humble video game arcade may now be a shadow of what it once was, but Swedish design company Love Hultén's beautiful R-Kaid-R ensures that your nostalgia-filled gaming can be just as magical as your memories. It's a portable arcade system that comes with built-in support for MAME and a variety of console and computer systems – including Neo Geo, Atari 2600, Super Nintendo, and all of the point-and-click adventure games playable in ScummVM.  Read More

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