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Richard Moss

Richard Moss
Richard is a freelance writer and journalist based in Melbourne, Australia. He’s contributed to Ars Technica, Edge Magazine, Polygon, and many other publications. When not writing or trying to read the entire internet, you’ll likely find him dancing, playing games, dabbling in creative stuff, or learning about whatever catches his eye.
Top Articles by Richard Moss
  • New "invisibility cloak" keeps objects from being felt

    Scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have developed a method of concealing objects from the sensation of touch that would finally meet the exacting standards of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale princess, who felt a single pea prodding ...

  • Zero Latency creates a free-roaming wireless multiplayer VR experience

    "Virtual reality needs its arcade moment," argues Zero Latency co-founder Tim Ruse. The Oculus Rift and Project Morpheus headsets may be set to dominate your living room, but the Melbourne-based startup is aiming bigger – offering full immersion with...

  • Low-power laser triggers stem cells to repair teeth

    New research into tooth repair and stem cell biology may bring tissue and bone regeneration one step closer to reality – or at the very least, give us hope that we can throw away those nasty dentures.

  • Get nostalgic with the R-Kaid-R retro portable video arcade

    The humble video game arcade may now be a shadow of what it once was, but Swedish design company Love Hultén is letting gamers take a nostalgic step back in time with its beautiful R-Kaid-R portable arcade system.

  • KOR-FX haptic vest brings games closer to your chest

    That pounding in your chest when the action gets intense in a video game or movie takes on a new dimension with the KOR-FX 4DFX, a lightweight vest that translates audio into subtle vibrations that are meant to help you feel where explosions and guns...

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a method for large-scale 3D motion ...

It might soon be possible to perform large-scale 3D motion reconstructions of sporting events or other live performances, thanks to new research by scientists at Carnegie Mellon University. The researchers mounted 480 video cameras in a two-story geodesic dome that enabled them to track the motion of events such as a man swinging a baseball bat or confetti being thrown into the air.  Read More

The Glowbelt is a retractable, one-size-fits-all belt covered in 13 micro LEDs to make its...

It can be scary and more than a little perilous to be on the roads at night if you're not in a car, with being visible the first step to avoiding an accident. Even if you wear light colors, many drivers may not see you until it's too late. Such concerns about road safety drove UK-based design house BMC Innovations to create the Glowbelt, a self-retracting one-size-fits-all belt covered in enough LEDs to make you both highly visible in the black of night and well-dressed for a rave.  Read More

A fine-dust sensor that attaches to your smartphone could help you – and everyone else – m...

Fine dust pollution triggers all manner of health problems, but accurately tracking its concentration across cities and regions takes considerable manpower. That could get a whole lot easier with a sensor that attaches to a smartphone and measures particulate matter (fine dust) levels in the air, which is under development at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.  Read More

Swedish design firm Love Hultén's R-Kaid-R is an elegant retro arcade that you can fold up...

The humble video game arcade may now be a shadow of what it once was, but Swedish design company Love Hultén's beautiful R-Kaid-R ensures that your nostalgia-filled gaming can be just as magical as your memories. It's a portable arcade system that comes with built-in support for MAME and a variety of console and computer systems – including Neo Geo, Atari 2600, Super Nintendo, and all of the point-and-click adventure games playable in ScummVM.  Read More

It's now possible to hide an object from being felt, thanks to research by scientists at K...

Scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have developed a method of concealing objects from the sensation of touch that would finally meet the exacting standards of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale princess, who felt a single pea prodding her beneath 20 mattresses and 20 feather beds.  Read More

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have devised a method of using ligh...

The trouble with existing 3D imaging technology is that – at the consumer level, at least – it tends to struggle with distances beyond a few feet. Put even a third of the width of a basketball court between yourself and a Microsoft Kinect sensor, for instance, and it won't pick up your movements at all. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, claim to have developed a Lidar (light radar)-based system that can remotely sense objects across distances as long as 30 feet (10 m), which could have widespread benefits in fields as diverse as entertainment, transportation, robotics, and mobile phones.  Read More

New research indicates that it may one day be possible for us to regrow teeth ... with som...

Ranking among the X-Men probably isn't all that it's cracked up to be, but who wouldn't want their uncanny ability to regenerate lost bone or tissue? New research into tooth repair and stem cell biology, from a cross-institution team led by David Mooney of Harvard's Wyss Institute, may bring such regeneration one step closer to reality – or at the very least, give us hope that we can throw away those nasty dentures.  Read More

Melbourne-based startup Zero Latency built a wireless cooperative virtual reality environm...

"Virtual reality needs its arcade moment," argues Zero Latency co-founder Tim Ruse. The Oculus Rift headset may be making waves around the tech sphere and zeroing in on a takeover of home entertainment, but to really experience immersion, the Melbourne-based startup aims to prove you need to add full-body motion tracking and a big space that players can move around in. No wires, no gamepads, no treadmills.  Read More

Dr. Steve Jiang and UT Southwestern Medical Center are pioneering the use of general-purpo...

Medical physicists at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center are latching on to advances in the computational speed of graphics processing units (GPUs) to drastically reduce the time required to calculate radiation therapy plans. The approach also increases the accuracy of calculations, allowing for faster, more precise, and more adaptable treatment of cancer patients.  Read More

Mobile network operators across Africa and the Middle East have teamed up to accelerate mo...

Nine mobile network operators across 48 countries in Africa and the Middle East have joined forces on the GSM Association’s Mobile Money Interoperability (MMI) program. The program aims to develop standards and implement convenient and affordable financial services across the regions, where many citizens have limited access to traditional banking services.  Read More

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