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Richard Moss

Richard Moss
Richard is a freelance writer and journalist based in Melbourne, Australia. He’s contributed to Ars Technica, Edge Magazine, Polygon, and many other publications. When not writing or trying to read the entire internet, you’ll likely find him dancing, playing games, dabbling in creative stuff, or learning about whatever catches his eye.
Top Articles by Richard Moss
The Hands Omni haptic glove gives its wearer the sense that they're physically holding a v...

While virtual reality has progressed leaps and bounds in the past few years, with motion-based inputs and a plethora of promising VR headsets close on the horizon, our ability to actually feel what we see in virtual worlds remains limited – especially in the consumer space. But a team of engineering students at Rice University is trying to solve this problem with a haptic glove that lets you feel virtual objects and environments like they're actually there.  Read More

The micropump directly releases epilepsy drugs into the brain where they act to inhibit ne...

A promising new treatment for epilepsy directly targets the nerve cells, deep within the brain, that cause seizures. The treatment uses an electronic micropump and an anticonvulsant drug to inhibit the relevant areas of the brain without affecting healthy brain regions. It has had promising initial results on mice in vitro and will now be tested on live animals.  Read More

The Xiaomi Mi 4i sports a 5-inch screen and upper mid-range specs at a buget price, with f... Having already bestowed some flattery upon the iPad mini with its Mi Pad, Chinese electronics giant has continued the theme with its latest (upper) mid range smartphone, the Mi 4i. Revealed at an event in New Delhi yesterday, the Mi 4i looks a bit like the iPhone 6 and iPhone 5s had a love child, but packs an impressive set of specs for its budget price.  Read More

A new e-paper display can be written and drawn on with a magnet (Image: Yusuke Komazaki/Un...

By repurposing and updating an e-paper technology from the 1970s, researchers from the University of Tokyo have created a cheap but tough new electronic display that can be written on with a magnet. This new e-paper could be used in low-cost, lightweight electronic whiteboards as well as traditional classroom blackboards, and its creators hope that it will eventually reduce our dependence on real paper.  Read More

Italian research studio Mhox's EYE concept could see a future where people replace their n...

Imagine being able to see in black and white or with an Instagram-like filter, or to have what you see through your eyes transmitted wirelessly, simply by swallowing a pill. Or imagine having vision so sharp and accurate that your visual acuity is on par with the most sight-adept people in the world. Italian research studio Mhox hopes to one day make this a reality with its EYE concept, which would offer 3D bioprinted eyes that replace your existing eyeballs.  Read More

Google Maps for the Body showing a human hip bone

The algorithms used for zooming in and out on Google Maps and Google Street View have made it possible to visually traverse through layers of the body – starting with a whole joint and drilling all the way down to the cellular level. The new imaging system could have huge implications in medicine because it drastically reduces the time required to analyze and compare data.  Read More

Scientists close in on computers that work like the human brain

Scientists have been working since 2008 to develop technology based on memristors (short for memory resistors), which promise computers that need never boot up and function more akin to the human brain – like neurons, they can retain information and perform logic operations. Now scientists at Northwestern University have made a new breakthrough that may make possible brain-like computing capabilities.  Read More

Ordinary inkjet printers can be given a special cartridge containing DNA-based bio-ink tha...

Sensors that identify infectious disease and food contaminants may soon be printed on paper using ordinary office inkjet printers. Researchers at McMaster University have developed a prototype that could lead to a commercial product in the next few years which helps doctors and scientists in the field quickly detect certain types of cancer or bacterial and respiratory infections or monitor toxin levels in water.  Read More

A tiny, cheap chip may soon bring 3D imaging to smartphones, robotics, and many other area...

As if smartphones can't already do enough, soon they may be able to scan three-dimensional objects and send the resultant high-resolution 3D images to a 3D printer that produces hyper-accurate replicas. This comes thanks to a small and inexpensive device called a nanophotonic coherent imager (NCI), which was developed by scientists at Caltech. The NCI could add 3D imaging to a variety of other devices and applications such as improving motion sensitivity in human machine interfaces and driverless cars.  Read More

An inflatable sports and outdoors-style vest relieves anxiety and stress with deep pressur...

Sometimes, when you're feeling anxious, all you need is a hug. But the thought of actually hugging someone might instil yet more anxiety. That's where the Snug Vest comes in. It uses a clinical method known as deep pressure therapy to essentially simulate a hug, which has been found to help reduce anxiety and stress and to be an effective treatment for people with autism or ADHD.  Read More

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