Advertisement
more top stories »

Paul Ridden

Paul Ridden

While Paul is loath to reveal his age, he will admit to cutting his IT teeth on a TRS-80 (although he won't say which version). An obsessive fascination with computer technology blossomed from hobby into career before the desire for sunnier climes saw him wave a fond farewell to his native Blighty in favor of Bordeaux, France. He's now a dedicated newshound pursuing the latest bleeding edge tech for Gizmag.

Follow Paul:

— Computers

Intel introduces second generation Core processors

Twenty new processors, new chipsets and new wireless solutions - including new Core i7, i5 and i3 processors, Intel 6 Series Chipsets, and Intel Centrino WiFi and WiMAX adapters - were introduced by Intel at CES today. The company brings a host of new features to the combined processor and powerful high definition graphics architecture, including super fast video conversion functionality and the ability to beam content to HDTVs via a new version of Intel WiDi. Collaborations with HD movie providers will also result in user being able to watch previously unavailable content on a PC screen. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Joby does it again with clever and gorgeous iPad cover/stand

Although Joby has found yet another use for its bendy support technology with the Yogi iPad stand, our eyes were drawn to the company's other release at this year's CES. If you're a fan of origami then you are simply going to love the seriously clever Ori, and even if you just don't get the fine art of paper folding we still think you'll be impressed. As well as spending some of its life as a protective cover, this smart-looking metallic stand can also transform into different structures to provide a variety of viewing possibilities. Read More
— Music

Kicktronic offers full rhythm section on tap

Street musicians or solo performers who want to add a virtual backing band but don't relish the prospect of sacrificing the feel of the music to overly digitized loopers or sequencers may be interested in the Kicktronic system from Flotechnic. If you stomp your foot rhythmically while playing, then you might as well put it to more efficient use by tapping the system's foot sensor to bring in a bass drum, snare drum, crash cymbal and bass. Read More
— Music

Let's twist again: The Teti Extreme Loudspeakers

Italian design is renowned for being both bold and daring, with an eye for quality too. The Teti Extreme Loudspeakers from Book of Music are no exception. Named after the Greek sea nymph Thetis, mother of Achilles, the twisted towers stand some 4.75 feet (1.45 meters) high and sport a couple of high end Scan-Speak drivers. The structure is made up of identical modules rotating about a vertical axis, and is said to be the result of much tweaking and refinement to ensure that the drivers maintain a balanced phase relationship. Read More
— Music

Synthesizer, sequencer, and multitrack editor squeezed into one handheld unit

Japan's CyberStep has announced its expansion into the music business, with the development of the KDJ-ONE portable digital audio workstation (DAW). The device brings a synthesizer, sequencer, and multitrack audio editing into one unit, which sees user interaction via a touchscreen, a keypad, arrow pad and jog control. The mobile DAW is powered by an Atom processor, has included SSD storage and microSD expansion, and benefits from USB and Wireless LAN connectivity. Read More
— Mobile Technology

DanKam app clears up color blind confusion

Best known for discovering security flaws in online systems, Dan Kaminsky has recently announced the development and release of a smartphone app to help with color blindness. DanKam takes the colors that cause viewing problems and applies filters to make them visible. The system is currently optimized for the most common form of color vision deficiency, although users are encouraged to customize and tweak the augmented reality app to try and find settings that work best for them. Read More
— Laptops

Tiny Swiftpoint mouse designed for use on laptops

Laptop users who work on the move usually find themselves having to use the trackpad more than they'd like. It's useful in tight spaces but it's not half as comfortable or useful as a real mouse. The Swiftmouse is said to provide all of the functionality and ease of use associated with a standard mouse, combined with the comfort of a stylus or pen, in a format that lends itself to being used in situations where space is limited. The wireless micro-mouse also benefits from magnetic docking and charging and some rapid scroll wizardry. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement