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Paul Ridden

ARCHOS has unveiled five new Android tablets with screen sizes ranging from 2.8-inches (71...

Apple has pretty much defined what many of us now consider to be a tablet computer. When the term is used, we automatically think of a 9.56 x 7.47-inch (242.8 x 189.7mm) iPad. Now, French consumer electronics company Archos is about to have us question that perception with the announcement of five new internet tablets with screen sizes ranging from 2.8-inches (71mm) diagonally across to 10.1-inches (257mm). The new devices will all run on Android 2.2 (Froyo) with support for Adobe's Flash 10.1 player, be powered by either 800MHz or 1GHz processors and sport built-in 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi.  Read More

Researchers from the University of Michigan have unveiled a more efficient, brighter and h...

Only a small percentage of backlight actually makes its way out through the multiple layers that make up the ubiquitous LCD displays we use today. That may change with the development of new filter technology at the University of Michigan. White light is sent through tiny, precisely spaced gaps on nano-thin sheets of aluminum and is said to result in brighter, higher definition color reproduction. Other benefits of the technology include efficiency gains and simpler manufacturing.  Read More

NEC has developed a new bioplastic from non-edible cellulose and cardanol that's said to b...

NEC has announced the development of a new biomass-based plastic produced by bonding non-edible cellulose with cardanol, a primary component of cashew nut shells. The new bioplastic is said to achieve a level of durability that makes it suitable for use in electronic equipment and boasts a high plant composition ratio of more than 70 per cent.  Read More

Sony has introduced a couple of new Alpha digital SLR cameras featuring its new Translucen...

If you've suffered a missed photo opportunity due to the short time your digital SLR takes to get its mirror out of the way, then Sony reckons it has the answer. The mirror inside the new α33 and α55 digital cameras doesn't move out of the way at all, it's just semi-transparent and simply allows the light from the lens through to the CMOS sensor while also redirecting some to the camera's autofocus sensor. Whether shooting stills or high definition video, Sony says that its new technology allows for simultaneous image capture and fast, accurate autofocus.  Read More

The Heliotrope power house dominates the landscape at the foot of the Black Forest

If someone asks you to describe a solar power plant you'd likely look to convey an image of row upon row of sun-soaking panels pointing skyward. It's doubtful that the first thought to pop into your head would be of someone's home, unless of course you've already witnessed the likes of the Heliotrope. Sited at the foot of the Black Forest in Germany, this magnificent cylindrical power house is the creation of solar architect Rolf Disch and is the world's first home to produce more energy than it consumes. As the architect announces plans to take his PlusEnergy vision to a global audience, we take a closer look at his first creation.  Read More

JVC's new Picsio GC-WP10 is IPX8 certified waterproof and records up to 1080p high def vid...

JVC has long been a major force in hand-held camcorders, but last year turned its attention to the world of pocket-cams with the release of the Picsio GC-FM1 which offered full 1080p high definition video and 8 megapixel stills. Now the company has added a couple more models to its Picsio range, the waterproof GC-WP10 and the GC-FM2.  Read More

Viking Modular has placed SSD storage on a DDR3 memory module to create SATADIMM

Viking Modular has unveiled a novel approach to adding a solid state storage boost to a computer or server. Instead of being bound by the familiar 2.5 or 3.5 inch (63.5/88.9mm) form factor, the company has introduced SATADIMM - storage on a memory module. It's shaped like system RAM and slides into DDR3 slots on the motherboard but connecting up its onboard SATA interface results in up to 200GB Enterprise Class Solid State Drive storage being made available. Although likely to find its way into business systems and data center servers in the immediate future, system designers may well find the module useful for creating even thinner mobile devices, such as tablet computers.  Read More

The judges have announced the semi-finalists in the James Dyson Award competition

Can you feel the mounting tension? The judges for the James Dyson Award 2010 have now revealed the competition's semi-finalists. Entries from 18 countries have been whittled down to just 20 items, some of which we've seen before in Gizmag and others which may be new to you. Most of the remaining projects now benefit from a short video overview, so let's have a quick look at some we haven't yet featured.  Read More

A homemade laser microscope has revealed the very lively, secret life of a drop of water

Some burning questions have just got to be answered, no matter the substantial costs involved. One such question demanding attention is: can a laser pointer be used to examine the microscopic contents of a drop of water? Happily, the answer is yes, and without the aforementioned prohibitive expense. In this home experiment, a laser pointer was shone through a drop of water collected from the base of a potted plant and the magnified image projected on an opposing wall. Read on to see a video showing a bemused-looking cat watching the resulting light show.  Read More

A Scanning Nonlinear Dielectric Microscope Inset left: shows topography and electric dipol...

For most of us, storing and accessing the vast majority of our computer data involves using either hard disk or solid state drives or perhaps a combination of both. Each method boasts its own advantages and while the battle for storage supremacy between the two rages in public, research at Japan's Tohoku University has revealed another option. Using a pulse generator to alter the electrical state of tiny dots on a ferroelectric medium, Kenkou Tanaka and Yasuo Cho have successfully recorded data at around eight times the density of current hard disk drives.  Read More

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