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Paul Ridden

Paul Ridden

While Paul is loath to reveal his age, he will admit to cutting his IT teeth on a TRS-80 (although he won't say which version). An obsessive fascination with computer technology blossomed from hobby into career before the desire for sunnier climes saw him wave a fond farewell to his native Blighty in favor of Bordeaux, France. He's now a dedicated newshound pursuing the latest bleeding edge tech for Gizmag.

Follow Paul:

— Music

Let's twist again: The Teti Extreme Loudspeakers

By - January 4, 2011 2 Pictures
Italian design is renowned for being both bold and daring, with an eye for quality too. The Teti Extreme Loudspeakers from Book of Music are no exception. Named after the Greek sea nymph Thetis, mother of Achilles, the twisted towers stand some 4.75 feet (1.45 meters) high and sport a couple of high end Scan-Speak drivers. The structure is made up of identical modules rotating about a vertical axis, and is said to be the result of much tweaking and refinement to ensure that the drivers maintain a balanced phase relationship. Read More
— Music

Synthesizer, sequencer, and multitrack editor squeezed into one handheld unit

By - January 4, 2011 17 Pictures
Japan's CyberStep has announced its expansion into the music business, with the development of the KDJ-ONE portable digital audio workstation (DAW). The device brings a synthesizer, sequencer, and multitrack audio editing into one unit, which sees user interaction via a touchscreen, a keypad, arrow pad and jog control. The mobile DAW is powered by an Atom processor, has included SSD storage and microSD expansion, and benefits from USB and Wireless LAN connectivity. Read More
— Mobile Technology

DanKam app clears up color blind confusion

By - January 4, 2011 2 Pictures
Best known for discovering security flaws in online systems, Dan Kaminsky has recently announced the development and release of a smartphone app to help with color blindness. DanKam takes the colors that cause viewing problems and applies filters to make them visible. The system is currently optimized for the most common form of color vision deficiency, although users are encouraged to customize and tweak the augmented reality app to try and find settings that work best for them. Read More
— Laptops

Tiny Swiftpoint mouse designed for use on laptops

By - January 4, 2011 9 Pictures
Laptop users who work on the move usually find themselves having to use the trackpad more than they'd like. It's useful in tight spaces but it's not half as comfortable or useful as a real mouse. The Swiftmouse is said to provide all of the functionality and ease of use associated with a standard mouse, combined with the comfort of a stylus or pen, in a format that lends itself to being used in situations where space is limited. The wireless micro-mouse also benefits from magnetic docking and charging and some rapid scroll wizardry. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

The golden secret to young-looking skin revealed?

By - January 3, 2011 6 Pictures
For as long as I can remember, keeping skin young and fresh has generally involved the liberal application of various moisturizing and nourishing creams with strange-sounding ingredients and an even greater number of anti-aging claims. Spain's Nylstar has managed to bind an important component of skin with 24K gold at a nanoscale level to create NYG nanoparticles. The new nanomaterial is then integrated with nylon fibers to make something called Nylgold dermawear, which is said to have a nourishing and protective effect on the skin of the wearer. Read More
— Music

The album's on the button badge

By - January 3, 2011 4 Pictures
Like many folks, when I was a youngster I used to wear lots of button badges to proudly show what bands I liked. Imagine how cool it would be to allow friends to plug a set of earphones into your badge and let them listen to your favorite bands too. That's exactly what the Playbutton MP3 player will allow you to do. Each device will carry one album's worth of music, have controls on the back to play and skip tracks and adjust EQ, and contain a Li-ion battery for up to five hours of continuous playback. Read More
— Science

Researchers develop interactive, emotion-detecting GPS robot

By - January 3, 2011
While computer systems are now very capable of recognizing vocal input, they offer minimal interactive feedback. A team of Cambridge University researchers have now developed a system that can not only detect a user's emotional state, but can also make expressive responses of its own. Using a robotic likeness of the godfather of the programmable computer, Charles Babbage, the team has hooked the system up to a driving simulator and created a computerized driving companion and navigator that reacts to the driver in much the same way as a human passenger. Read More
— Music

Grace Digital gets colorful for CES

By - January 3, 2011 2 Pictures
San Diego's Grace Digital Audio has announced that it will be introducing three new Internet radios at CES 2011 in Las Vegas, all sporting color screens. If the 50,000 or so local, national and international stations are not enough to satisfy, the new batch will also gain two new services to complement existing offerings from the likes of Pandora, CBS Radio, Live365.com and NPR. They also represent the first color Internet radios with 802.11n connectivity. Read More
— Music

Closing the gap with the Doubleneck guitar

By - December 31, 2010 5 Pictures
Probably the most famous example of a twin neck guitar is the Siamese SG used by the likes of Jimmy Page and Don Felder – the Gibson EDS-1275. With its new Doubleneck guitar, Veillette Guitars has managed to narrow the gap between the two necks in a lightweight package to offer a more comfortable experience for the player. Angular bridges also mean that the guitarist can pick hard or strum wildly on the upper 12-string section without fear of accidentally encroaching on the 6-string's domain. Read More
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