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Leon Gettler

Scandinavian researchers have trialled a GPS application to aid in giving care to dementia...

Researchers at Scandinavia’s largest research organization, SINTEFF, have been trialling a prototype GPS application to track dementia sufferers living at home, in institutions, and in other forms of shared accommodation facilities. The project has seen more than 50 dementia sufferers using the system for periods of up to a year and according to the researchers, people equipped with it felt safer, had more freedom to move around and enjoyed better quality of life.  Read More

GravitySpace recognizes people and objects based on the pressure imprints they leave on th...

Smart floors could soon be part of our smart homes. Scientists in Germany have developed a high-resolution pressure-sensitive floor that can accurately keep track of people and furniture in rooms. Dubbed "Gravity Space," the floor can detect poses, movements and collisions and create a mirror-like inverse projection of the goings-on above. The technology could have a wide range of applications ranging from home security and automation to interactive gaming.  Read More

David’s myotis, a tiny insectivorous bat native to China, was one of two bat species selec...

Scientists believe the genes of virus-resistant and long-living wild bats might hold clues to treating cancer and infectious diseases in humans. The theory is that when bats started flying millions of years ago, something changed in their DNA that provides resistance to viruses and helps give them a relatively long life. The researchers hope a better understanding of bat evolution could lead to new treatments for disease and aging in humans.  Read More

Swedish researchers believe that size is they key to furthering the development of nanowir...

In a breakthrough that could lead to more efficient and cheaper solar cells, scientists at Sweden's Lund University claim to have identified the ideal diameter for nanowires to convert sunlight into electricity.  Read More

Rice University research scientist Ekaterina Lukianova-Hleb adjusts equipment used in expe... U.S. scientists are developing a technique that will target and kill cancer cells while simultaneously treating others in the same sample. Centered on fine-tuning the use of cancer destroying nanobubbles, the research holds promise for treating cancer patients in a way that’s far more targeted than chemotherapy.  Read More

An study led by Indiana University has found that linking two hormones into a single molec...

With recent studies finding that – for the first time – more people now die from obesity-related illnesses like heart attacks and strokes than malnutrition, scientists have been tackling the fat problem. One of the latest breakthroughs in this field comes from the University of Indiana where researchers have found that combining two hormones into a single molecule could lead to improved treatments for medical conditions such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.  Read More

Quadriplegic Jan Scheuermann prepares to take a bite out of a chocolate bar she is guiding...

Earlier this year, a 58 year-old woman who had lost the use of her limbs was successfully able to drink a cup of coffee by herself using a robotic arm controlled by her thoughts via a brain computer interface (BCI). Now, in a separate study, another woman with longstanding quadriplegia has been able to feed herself a chocolate bar using a mind-controlled, human-like robot arm offering what researchers claim is a level of agility and control approaching that of a human limb  Read More

'If this could be used as a treatment one day, it is conceivable that patients would only ... Scientists at The Rockefeller University have found that harnessing proteins from the human immune system can suppress the HIV virus in mice. Potentially, this could lead to a therapeutic approach to treating the virus that does not require a daily application of drugs.  Read More

Adding more filler to the fiber-filled area around the cells could slow the decline of agi...

The latest development in the quest for eternal youth concerns that most visible sign of aging – the skin. Scientists at the University of Michigan (U-M) have found that it might be possible to slow the decline of aging tissue by focusing not on the cells but on the stuff that surrounds those cells. By adding more filler to the fiber-filled area around the cells, they were able to make the skin cells of senior citizens act like younger cells again.  Read More

Artists rendering of the Aeroscraft

The Aeroscraft airship, with its minimal fuel consumption, vertical take-off and landing capabilities and point-to-point delivery is promising to revolutionize aviation. This radical new vehicle platform created by the Aeros Corporation in California is now entering its final stages of development and in this interview the company's founder and CEO, Igor Pasternak, talks to Gizmag about how different the Aeroscraft will be from anything else we have seen before.  Read More

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