Advertisement

Lakshmi Sandhana

Good Thinking

"We Feel" tool uses Twitter to provide real-time view of world's emotions

A new online tool aims to create a real-time emotional map of how people all over the world feel, from analyzing how cheerful or depressed different countries might be, to how budget cuts or other news might hit people emotionally. Called "We Feel," the tool analyzes 32,000 tweets a minute to monitor people's collective mood swings and how their emotions fluctuate over time globally. Read More

Medical

Prototype prints precise, patient-specific drug doses

It can be tricky to take exactly one fourths of a pill or the specific dose of prescribed medication, which is why researchers at Purdue University have come up with a way to print the proper dosage that a patient requires. Their prototype uses inkjet printing technology and a predictive mathematical model that calculates exactly how much medicine the patients needs and prints out the precise doses into tablets or films.Read More

Aircraft

Aero-X hoverbike set to take off in 2017

That most long-awaited form of transport may finally be arriving with California-based Aerofex announcing that it'll be launching its Aero-X hoverbike in 2017 at an estimated price of US$85,000 (+CPI). The company is already accepting refundable deposits of $5,000 on its website, with first flights scheduled for 2016. The Aero-X is designed to carry two people up to a height of 10 ft above the ground and reach speeds of up to 42 mph.Read More

Marine

Sea-Eye monitors the oceans even when tipped upside down

Bad weather can play havoc with unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) patrolling the seas, which is why scientists at the Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP) have come up with a USV prototype that works even when it tips over. Called Sea-Eye, the battery-powered vehicle features a design that enables it to work just as well upside down as right way up.Read More

Science

Shape-changing implantable transistors grip living tissue

A multinational group of scientists has developed implantable shape-changing transistors that can grip nerves, blood vessels and tissues. According to the researchers, these soft electronic devices can change shape within the body, while still maintaining their electronic properties, allowing them to be used in a variety of applications and treatments.Read More

Medical

Wearable smart veins locator could help nurses see below the skin

Getting a needle into a patient's vein can sometimes be a complicated process, especially if the veins aren't visible. Vein-spotting spectacles that see through a patient's skin could help avoid the damage caused by repeated needle pricks, and that's exactly what researchers at the University Teknologi Petronas (UTP), Malaysia, are developing. Their Smart Veins Locator is a wearable head-mounted display that allows nurses to see the patient's veins in real-time, by overlaying a map of their veins on top of their skin.Read More

Science

Water droplet networks could harvest water from fog

Harvesting water out of thin air, might seem like a pipe dream, but the air-stable water droplet networks, currently being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers could prove to be a step in the right direction. Created with the aid of a new technique, these water droplet networks could also potentially find use in membrane research and biological sensing applications.Read More

Space

Inflatable flying saucers could help spacecraft land on Mars

It's tough to slow down spacecraft descending through Mars' thin atmosphere at supersonic speeds, as they need to drop to a speed that allows them to land in one piece. This is why NASA is developing lightweight inflatable flying saucers that will fit around the outer rims of spacecraft such as human habitats, inflating as the habitats descend to permit a safe landing. The technology will allow astronauts to land bigger and heavier spacecraft on Mars without needing to carry massive atmospheric shields or huge amounts of extra fuel. Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning