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Jan Belezina

Jan Belezina

Formerly in charge of Engadget Poland, Jan Belezina's long time fascination with the advance of new technology has led him to become Gizmag's eyes and ears in Eastern Europe.

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— Good Thinking

D-Shape 3D printer can print full-sized houses

By - February 24, 2012 8 Pictures
The growing popularity of 3D printers, such as the Printbot or MakerBot's Thing-o-Matic, testify to the fact that additive manufacturing is slowly entering the mainstream. The devices are now small enough to fit on a desk and they can make all sorts of stuff, such as toys, chess figures, or spare door knobs. But what if you want to make something slightly bigger - say, a house? Then you need to turn to Enrico Dini, the founder of Monolite UK and the inventor of the D-Shape "robotic building system." Read More
— Mobile Technology

Detonate the transparency grenade to instantly collect and leak sensitive data

By - February 20, 2012 19 Pictures
If you thought Wikileaks was a disruptive idea, the transparency grenade is going to blow you away. This tiny bit of hardware hidden under the shell shaped like a classic Soviet F1 hand grenade allows you to leak information from anywhere just by pulling a pin. The device is essentially a small computer with a powerful wireless antenna and a microphone. Following detonation, the grenade intercepts local network traffic and captures audio data, then makes the information immediately available online. Read More
— Science

Google's PageRank algorithm used to model hydrogen bonds in water

By - February 20, 2012 2 Pictures
Aurora Clark from Washington State University has found an unlikely application for Google's link ranking technology - harnessing it to analyze hydrogen bonds in water. Connecting the fields of computer engineering and chemistry, her project aims to predict chemical reactivity between differently shaped particles while bypassing the hassle and expense of carrying out actual lab-based experiments. Read More
— Automotive

Nevada approves regulations for self-driving cars

By - February 17, 2012 1 Picture
Nevada is now officially the first state in the USA where the operation of self-driving vehicles on public roads is regulated by law. The regulations approved by the Legislative Commission of the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles set out guidelines for companies who want to test autonomous vehicles on public roadways. They also include a set of requirements for people who'd like to "drive" such vehicles. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

CAMDASS could help untrained personnel perform complicated medical procedures

By - February 13, 2012 5 Pictures
Before we are able to download knowledge straight to our brains - Matrix style - gaining medical expertise will remain a slow and painful process. That's fine by most people, who can just go and visit a trained doctor. But what if you are a member of a small team of specialists operating at a remote, isolated location with no immediate access to medical resources? Then you either need to be a doctor, or you need the Computer Assisted Medical Diagnosis and Surgery System. Devised by the European Space Agency (ESA), the augmented reality-based CAMDASS aims to provide astronauts with instant medical know-how. Read More
— Automotive

Odorico Pordenone caravan concept brings style to the campground

By - February 13, 2012 15 Pictures
Jakub Novak, a Czech student from Brno University of Technology, designed a trailer that would look oddly out of place in a campground. Odorico Pordenone, named after Italian medieval traveler Odoric of Pordenone, offers all the benefits of a luxury camper van, while also allowing you to show off your stunning sports car. Expandable when stationary, the trailer strikes a fine balance between utility and beauty. Although Novak was awarded the Czech National Award for Student Design last year, the project remains only a concept. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Squid fitness monitoring shirt keeps track of your gym progress

By - February 8, 2012 3 Pictures
Unless you have a personal fitness instructor following you around with a notepad, keeping track of your progress at the gym can be a real nuisance. Luckily, thanks to a group of students from from Northeastern University in Boston, you can now count on your squid-equipped shirt to do the statistical heavy lifting for you. Squid is essentially a set of electromyography (EMG) sensors attached to a box that pushes your workout data to a smartphone app. This is synchronized with a web-based management panel, to give you a detailed overview of your progress. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Mask stuffed with micro-components could work miracles for severe facial burn patients

By - February 1, 2012 1 Picture
Engineers and researchers at the University of Texas, Arlington in collaboration with military medical institutions aim to develop a mask that would use mechanical, electrical and biological components to speed up the healing process following severe facial burns. The flexible polymer face mold is to be fitted with sensors for the monitoring of the healing process. If necessary, embedded components would selectively administer the appropriate pharmaceuticals to the right section of the wound. The aim of the Biomask project is not only to prevent further disfigurement, but also to facilitate facial tissue regeneration in injured soldiers. Read More
— Military

Self-guided bullet could hit laser-marked targets from a mile away

By - January 31, 2012 2 Pictures
A group of researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have built a prototype of a small-caliber bullet capable of steering itself towards a laser-marked target located approximately 2,000 meters (1.2 miles) away. The dart-like design has passed the initial testing stage, which included computer simulations as well as field-testing prototypes built from commercially available parts. Read More
— Robotics

Tiny magnetically-levitated robots could change the game for robotics

By - January 20, 2012 9 Pictures
The past five to ten years have seen the birth of microbotics. A whole range of components that are vital for building robots, such as actuators, motors or batteries, became available in micro-scale only fairly recently. Finally enthusiasts got what they needed to put their own systems together, and the whole field benefited from their work. But there are obvious limitations to scaling down robots full of sensors, motors, and other mechanisms. That is, unless you make the machines extremely simple, which is exactly what Ron Pelrine of SRI International has done. His work on levitated microrobots may have powerful implications for robotics, and is likely to bring us a step closer towards fast, precise and affordable robotic systems comprising thousands, if not millions of microrobots. Read More
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