Highlights from the 2014 LA Auto Show

Helen Clark

Top Articles by Helen Clark
  • Cable car planned for world's largest cave

    A Vietnamese resort company has been granted approval to begin surveys to build a 10.6 kilometer long cable car in the world’s largest cave, the UNESCO-listed Son Doong in north-central Quang Binh province in Vietnam.

  • Camera system sees around corners without using a mirror

    Researchers from the University of Bonn in Germany and the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada have developed a camera that can see around corners without the aid of mirrors. The system can reconstruct the shape of objects using diffu...

  • Scientists eliminate HIV from cultured human cells

    Researchers from Temple University School of Medicine have discovered how to permanently extricate HIV-1 from human cells, possibly avoiding the need for lifelong drug treatment. Though in its very early stages, this may prove to be a critical step i...

  • By-product hydrogen used to power fuel cell pilot plant

    By-products are common to most industries. Some are harmless, some dangerous and others useless. Others are simply under-utilized. Finland's VTT is using hydrogen generated as a by-product of the sodium chlorate production process in its pilot-scale ...

  • Newly discovered fungus holds clues to stopping superbugs

    A research team from McMaster University, the University of British Columbia and Cardiff University has discovered a fungus in the soil of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia that may offer hope in an increasingly fraught battle against drug-resista...

Artist's rendering of synthetic platelets that mimic, and outperform, natural platelets (I...

The skin is the body's first line of defense against infection. And when this barrier is broken, or an internal organ is ruptured, it is the process of coagulation, or clotting, which relies largely on blood cells called platelets, that seals the breach and stems the flow of blood. Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have now synthesized nanoparticles that mimic the form and function of platelets, but can do more than just accelerate the body's natural healing processes.  Read More

The wearable DynePod

American startup Dynepic understands something every small child does: toys can, and do, talk to each other. And you can talk to them, too. Dynepic is aiming to develop an "Internet of Toys" architecture where toys and their controlling devices – the DynePods – are connected and controllable via an open source cloud system which can be programmed from an iPad.  Read More

Youbionic says its hands will cost around €1,000, a fraction of the price of current comme...

Italian start-up Youbionic has created a functional, myoelectric bionic hand using 3D printing and Arduino components. While still at prototype stage, the company says that its research will result in a prosthetic hand that costs a tenth or less than other models on the market.  Read More

This smart watch-like device is designed to assist the elderly with basic tasks like remem...

As our life spans increase, more services and care will be needed for the elderly, especially those who live independently. Technology clearly has an increasing role to play in improving home care and health monitoring. The latest developments from German research group Fraunhofer are a case in point.  Read More

The proposed $212 million cable car system would have three of its seven stations in the 9...

A Vietnamese resort company has been granted approval to begin surveys to build a 10.6 kilometer (6.6 mi) long cable car in the world’s largest cave, the UNESCO-listed Son Doong in north-central Quang Binh province in Vietnam. If completed it would make it the longest cable car ride in the world, ahead of Tianmen Shan in China.  Read More

The predictive abilities of big data is being used to improve farming outcomes (Photo: Shu...

Data scientists studying crop growth and weather patterns in Colombia have advised rice farmers not to plant crops, saving millions of dollars. The International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and the Colombian Rice Growers Federation have developed a computer model that can work out what crops work best under specific weather conditions in certain areas.  Read More

The new vaccine’s active ingredient comes from hookworms themselves, a protein from a comm...

A clinical trial of a permanent vaccine for hookworm has been completed in Brazil, giving hope for a permanent end to a problem that affects 600 million people worldwide. US-based Sabin Vaccine Institute, which has developed the vaccine has called hookworm "one of the most pervasive neglected tropical diseases (NTD) affecting the world’s poor."  Read More

Leach has spent more than a year studying the Hadza, who still eat a diet a man from sever...

American scientist Jeff Leach performed his own fecal transplant with stool borrowed from a hunter gatherer tribesman to better understand the changing nature of gut bacteria ecosystems. Mr Leach was working with the Human Food Project to study to Hadza tribe of Tanzania and the way their gut bacteria may differ from those of people in the West.  Read More

'The major question is, why would we not eat insects?' (Photo: Shutterstock)

Jiminy Cricket may be able to do more than guide our consciences: he, or his kin, may also provide food security solutions for a growing and hungry world. However, the notion of insects-as-food struggles to find widespread traction amid problems with standardization of food safety standards, government disinterest and only a small body of research. So is there a future for cricket sushi or fried silk worms?  Read More

The pocket  blocks transmissions, meaning your phone cannot be tracked or automatically up... A London-based label has created a line of clothing inspired by George Orwell's 1984 featuring pockets which can block all wireless transmissions, meaning your phone cannot be hacked or credit card details stolen.  Read More

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