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Heidi Hoopes

Heidi Hoopes
Heidi measures her life with the motley things she's done in the name of scientific exploration. While formally educated in biology and chemistry, informally she learns from adventures and hobbies with her family. Her simple pleasures in life are finding turtles while jogging and obsessively winnowing through her genetic data.
Top Articles by Heidi Hoopes
  • Fleet of eBee drones capture the immensity of the Matterhorn

    Explorers have mapped the surface of the iconic Matterhorn painstakingly by foot, by satellite, and now by drone, thanks to a small fleet of eBees launched by senseFly and Drone Adventures. The mission not only proved the eBee’s capabilities, but gen...

  • E-volo’s 18-rotor electric Volocopter makes maiden flight

    E-volo recently celebrated the maiden launch of the newest prototype of its electric two-passenger Volocopter, sporting eighteen rotors. The company champions its difference from traditional helicopters, pointing to its ease of flying, green energy s...

  • Nanoparticles found to violate second law of thermodynamics

    Hotter things always release heat to their colder environments, correct? Researchers show that particles on a nanoscale actually fluctuate more than we expect on a macro scale and develop new procedures to test what exactly is happening on the level ...

  • Scientists challenge economics of storing renewable energy

    It's easy to assume that renewable wind and solar energy should be stored when production exceeds what the grid is using. But scientists at Stanford have done the math to find when storing energy is better than "wasting” it, and their findings aren't...

  • Foodini 3D food printer customizes and automates your kitchen prep

    If you’ve been waiting for a food replicator in your kitchen, the Foodini 3D food printer might be the closest approximation. Once you provide it the ingredients, it automates and customizes food prep by shaping raviolis, decorating cookies, or even...

Saab's remote aircraft tower places human air controllers miles away from the airfield to ...

In a world first, air traffic controllers armed with a suite of high-tech video and sensor equipment have been authorized to direct flights over 100 km (61 mi) away at an airport in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden. The technology, developed by Saab, offers alternatives to consolidate smaller airfields with smaller budgets under one control, and provides options for training, crisis situations, and tower maintenance or refurbishing.  Read More

Nest is letting developers get hands-on with creating new ways to use the company's home a... Nest Labs has announced the launch of a developer program designed to drastically expand the diversity of its home automation devices and the number of products they interact with. Names like Mercedes-Benz, Jawbone and Google Now are already in the mix.  Read More

Tesla's EV technology is now available to other manufacturers, with Elon Musk's announceme...

In a gesture that’s as symbolic as it is game-changing for the EV industry, Elon Musk posted on Tesla’s blog this morning that "Tesla will not initiate patent lawsuits against anyone who, in good faith, wants to use our technology."  Read More

The treatment process in progress, using chemicals naturally abundant in wastewater to cle...

Using wastewater to clean itself is the premise of new Australian technology that relies on the formation of compounds called hydrotalicites, and which results in less sludge than traditional water treatment with lime. In one test in Australia, the equivalent of 20 Olympic-sized swimming pools of wastewater were treated, with final sludge reductions of up to 90 percent.  Read More

Bromine joins the other elements marked on this periodic table, as those critical for anim...

Joining the ranks of carbon, selenium, sulfur and 24 others as an essential element for animal life is element 35 – bromine – long considered inessential to life and moreso, shunned as a toxic disease-causing agent. However, researchers have identified the role bromine holds in animal development, even demonstrating death in fruit flies without access to this element named for its identifying stench.  Read More

A computer algorithm tracks eyes, ears, and a toy, with the goal of spotting warning sympt...

When experts look back over early home movies of babies later diagnosed with autism, they can see the early behavioral markers of the disorder. The average age of diagnosis, however, is 5 years old. The availability and cost of trained clinicians limits not just early awareness, but also research into autism on a large scale. At Duke University, researchers from different disciplines are using computer vision algorithms to make early diagnosis more likely, and even intend to create an app for parents to use at home.  Read More

Google's Project Tango lets this simple quadrotor autonomously navigate its environment

We’ve seen a lot of eye- and brain-catching robotics fun from the GRASP lab at the University of Pennsylvania, including a swarm of nano quadrotors playing the James Bond theme and a quadcopter swooping raptor-like onto prey. Dr. Vijay Kumar now gives us proof of concept of the utility of Google’s Project Tango in aerial systems by outfitting a quadrotor with the device to provide autonomous navigational capabilities.  Read More

This Corvette C7 Stingray is different than most in that its driver is quadriplegic and is...

What might it take to put a former Indy Racecar League driver back in the driver’s seat after a racing accident renders him quadriplegic? Perhaps a customized Corvette C7 Stingray, decked out by military and industry engineers to allow Sam Schmidt, now an owner of his own Indy team, to take back the metaphorical wheel.  Read More

Scientists have found an alternative to graphene, that has the added bonus of self-assembl...

Graphene may be talked about as the future wonder material (and for that matter, the present one), but it has one critical deficiency. It lacks a natural bandgap, the physical trait that puts the “semi” in “semiconductor," so it has to be doped to become effective. Enter Ni3(2,3,6,7,10,11-hexaiminotriphenylene)2 ... well, you can refer to it as a metal-organic graphene analogue for now. In addition to having a natural band gap, it’s able to self-assemble and represents a whole family of compounds that’s exciting to researchers for its novel properties.  Read More

3D printing allows researchers to create models of tumor tissue that more accurately repli...

Medical research is only as good as the model, whether you’re using one animal to stand in for another, or creating in vitro replicas of tissue and organs. A research lab at Drexel University specializing in biofabrication recently used 3D printing to create models of tumor tissue that more closely replicate real tumors than traditional 2D tissue culture. Appropriating tools in this manner could lead to a better understanding of how tumors grow, and importantly, how they die.  Read More

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