Advertisement

Grant Banks

Science

Organic flow battery could transform renewable energy storage

Researchers at Harvard have developed an inexpensive, high capacity, organic battery that uses carbon-based materials as electrolytes rather than metals. The researchers say the technology stands to be a game-changer in renewable energy storage by solving the intermittent generation problems faced by renewable sources, such as wind and solar. The battery offers large volume electricity storage not possible with solid-state batteries and at a fraction of the cost of existing flow battery technology.Read More

Bioglow sheds new light on indoor plants

Ever thought the glowing forests from the movie Avatar were pretty cool and wanted one yourself? Bioglow is the latest company to attempt to put such autoluminscent plants in homes with its aptly named Starlight Avatar.Read More

Electronics

WiTricity wireless charging system ready for market

Gizmag has followed the development of the resonant wireless power transfer technology WiTricty since it was first theorized in 2007. Now it appears the technology is only one step away from being available to consumers with the developers seeing take-up by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). The company has also displayed a wireless charging system designed for the iPhone 5 as proof of the capability and readiness of the technology for market.Read More

Science

Cause of aging reversed in mice: Human trials may start next year

With the wide-ranging benefits of reducing disease and enabling a longer, healthier life, reversing the causes of aging is a major focus of much medical research. A joint project between the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia and Harvard Medical School that restored communication within animal cells has the potential to do just that, and maybe more. With the researchers hoping to begin human clinical trials in 2014, some major medical breakthroughs could be just around the corner.Read More

Science

First vodka-powered text message sent

A molecular messaging system capable of transmitting data over several meters has been built using off-the-shelf materials costing around US$100 and some vodka. The system mimics chemical signalling seen in nature and has potential applications for communications in environments not compatible with conventional wireless technologies, such as underwater, in tunnels and pipelines, as well as at the nano scale and within the body.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning