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Emily Price

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— Digital Cameras

Nikon debuts the D4, its new flagship 16.2-megapixel DSLR

Who says all the good stuff has to be announced at CES? It's just a few days before the show, and Nikon has taken the wraps off its newest flagship DSLR - the Nikon D4. The 16-megapixel camera has been optimized for “speed and precision,” with a number of new features to make the camera both faster and to improve its overall image quality over its predecessor. The D4 has an ISO range from 100 to 204,800, allowing it to capture crisp photos in exceptionally low-light situations, a faster shutter speed that allows it to capture photos at 10 frames-per-second, and the ability to capture 1080p high definition video. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Aftershokz headphones deliver sound through cheeks rather than your ears

When you think of headphones, no matter what comes to mind, it's likely a set that fit inside or on top of your ears. There is another way however - headphones that transmit sound through your cheekbones using bone conduction. Initially developed for military use, we've seen a few examples of this technology before in headphones, waterproof MP3 players and even mobile phones and the latest to cross our desk - Aftershokz Bone Conduction Headphones - will be on show at CES next week. Read More
— Science

MIT develops a suit that makes you feel like you're 75 years old

What does it really feel like to be 75 years old? A group of researchers in MIT's Agelab have created a suit to help people understand what it might be like to navigate the world as a senior citizen. Called AGNES (Age Gain Now Empathy System), the suit replicates what it might be like to be in a 75-year-old body, replicating dexterity, flexibility, motor, and visual elements into a suit that can be worn by people of all ages. Read More
— Electronics

LG Electronics will unveil the world's largest 3D Ultra Definition TV at CES

LG will be unveiling the “world's largest 3D Ultra Definition TV” at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January. The 84-inch television has 8 million pixels, giving it four times the resolution clarity (3840 x 2160) of existing Full HD TVs. The television also utilizes LG's “Slim and Narrow Bezel Design,” which the company feels gives viewers “the most convincing 3D viewing experience currently available outside a movie theater.” Read More
— Mobile Technology

Free Wi-Fi coming to Japanese vending machines in 2012

Free Wi-Fi is on its way to some Japanese vending machines. Working much like a mobile hotspot at your local coffee shop, people located near the machines would be able to connect to the internet for 30 minutes at a time and surf the web. The vending machines are for the drink company Asahi. Connecting to the web using a machine can be done without any kind of log-in, and if your initial 30-minute connection to the network expires, you can connect again and keep on surfing. The service is available to anyone, to use with any smartphone, tablet, or computer and does not require the purchase of a drink from the machine. Read More
— Electronics

OreObject, a luxury mouse for affluent geeks

We've seen quite a few gadgets made out of gold throughout the years. From a gold-plated USB flash drive to a 24 carat Gold- and Platinum-leafed Aston Martin DB7, gold has long been a symbol of class and a way to add a little flash to what might otherwise be an ordinary gadget. Now we can add computer mice to that long list of fancy gold items, with the new Sphere 2 by Ore Object. The mouse is made of surgical grade stainless steel with either a titanium, gold, or platinum finish. Both stain and dirt resistant, the mouse's surface repels germs, and can be easily sanitized if necessary. Read More
— Automotive

Forget face detection - this Japanese car seat can tell who's sitting on it

Who needs face detection when your car can know who's sitting in it based on their rear-end? A group of Japanese researchers at the Advanced Institute of Industrial Technology (AIIT) have developed a car seat that can identify drivers while they're sitting down. The way the technology works is pretty simple. The seat is retrofitted with 360 different sensors. Those sensors take into account things like your weight, the highest value of pressure on the seat, and where you come in contact with the seat. The idea is that we all sit in car seats relatively the same way each time, so the seat should be able to tell who is sitting in it, ensuring that the person is the owner of the car rather than a car thief. Read More
— Science

Sony demos paper-fueled battery

We've heard of gadgets being powered by some pretty crazy stuff, but how about paper? Sony recently showed off a new bio-cell battery that breaks down paper in order to create power. A paper battery sounds a little bit far-fetched, but the technology works, and could potentially change how we power devices in the future. So how does it work? The process starts with an enzyme suspended in water. When paper is dropped in, the enzyme starts to break it down and produce glucose that can then be harvested and used to power a battery. Sony described the break down process as similar to how a termite might eat and break down wood. Read More
— Science

First Earth-size planets discovered beyond our solar system

NASA has discovered the first earth-size planets outside of our solar system. The discovery was made as part of NASA's Kepler mission and involves the discovery of two planets currently named after the project: Kepler-20e and Kepler-20f. If the Kepler name sounds familiar, that's because NASA also recently announced the discovery of Kepler-22b, the most Earth-like planet discovered to date. Kepler 22b is orbiting a star similar to our sun, and is capable of possessing liquid water, an essential feature for life to exist on a planet. Read More