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David Szondy

David Szondy

David Szondy is a freelance writer based in Monroe, Washington. An award-winning playwright, he has contributed to Charged and iQ magazine and is the author of the website Tales of Future Past.

— Around The Home

Gate smart mailbox combines snail mail and the Internet of Things

By - May 12, 2015 10 Pictures

In an age of Twitter, Facebook, and texting, a physical mailbox may seem like a relic of the dead (letter) past, but postal theft is still a big problem and people still get annoyed at fruitless journeys to the curb. The Gate smart mailbox is a 21st century variation on the old switch-and-doorbell mailbox alert setup that not only lets you know when the post arrives, but is also intended to combat theft.

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— Space

New spacesuit tech simulates gravity on a personal scale

By - May 11, 2015 2 Pictures

One thing that space definitely lacks is "down." Zero gravity isn't just disorienting, it also affects astronauts' health. Draper Laboratory's NASA-funded Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) uses a new spacesuit technology to create a sort of artificial gravity that provides astronauts with a sense of up and down while helping relieve some of the detrimental effects of weightlessness.

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— Space

NASA introduces traffic control for crowded Mars

By - May 10, 2015 1 Picture

Space may be big, but in our neck of the woods it's getting crowded. There are thousands of active and inactive satellites in orbit around Earth, and while Mars may not exactly be Piccadilly Circus, it now has five active satellites circling it. To prevent any unfortunate collisions around the Red Planet, NASA is working on a new traffic management system.

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— Automotive

Autonomous Freightliner Inspiration truck makes a splash at the Hoover Dam

By - May 8, 2015 23 Pictures

Self-driving cars might be grabbing all the headlines, but it seems like self-driving trucks might hit the road first. At the Hoover Dam outside of Las Vegas, Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA) showed off its Freightliner Inspiration Truck, which has been officially licensed to operate on public highways in the state of Nevada. The autonomous hauler allows the driver to hand over full control to the onboard computer under proper traffic and environmental conditions.

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— Bicycles

Wave eBike peddles affordability and speed

By - May 7, 2015 4 Pictures

If you don't live in some place flat like the Netherlands and you're of a certain age, electric bicycles seem like a pretty good idea. Unfortunately, they also tend to be rather expensive, but the creators of the Wave eBike are looking to buck the trend. Billed as "the world's most affordable electric bike ever," it is claimed to provide long range and high speed at half the price of comparable models.

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— Space

First space espresso served on the ISS

By - May 6, 2015 3 Pictures

Mornings on the International Space Station (ISS) got a bit brighter as the first cup of espresso coffee in space was brewed and drank on the station by Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti. To celebrate, Cristoforetti tweeted back to Earth a photo of her imbibing the brew, saying, "'Coffee: the finest organic suspension ever devised.' Fresh espresso in the new Zero-G cup! To boldly brew…"

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— Science

Large Hadron Collider limbers up after two-year overhaul

By - May 5, 2015 9 Pictures

Restarting the world's largest particle accelerator after a two-year overhaul isn't just a matter of throwing a switch and making sure the lights go on. It's an eight-week process of baby steps – one's that involve billions of electron volts. But the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) took a major step forward this week as the CERN team fired up two counter-rotating proton beams that were injected into the LHC using the Super Proton Synchrotron, then accelerated to an energy of 450 GeV each.

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— Military

BAE Systems combines night vision goggles with thermal targeting

By - May 5, 2015 1 Picture

In military parlance, the job of a soldier is to find, fix, and finish the enemy. However, this is a bit difficult when the soldier has to fumble with different scopes while keeping eyes on the target. To simplify things, BAE Systems is developing a combination night vision and thermal imaging system that not only allows soldiers to rapidly acquire and engage targets in all weather and lighting, but also to remotely aim their weapons without looking through the sights.

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