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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Science

NanoEnergy battery to tackle growing needs of consumer electronics

By - May 13, 2009 2 Pictures
As the rate of miniaturization of portable technology increases, so too does the need for smaller and smaller batteries to power them. Current devices, such as hearing aids and wireless sensor networks, that draw small amounts of power over an extended period of time have generally relied on coin-cell batteries to keep them running. Now ultra-thin bendable battery technology from Front-Edge Technology (FET), delivering between 10 and 20 times more power, may provide the advances the electronics industry needs. Read More
— Computers

Pencasts let you spruce up your website with a few doodles

By - May 12, 2009 5 Pictures
Even in the digital age, there are still some cases where the pen is mightier than the keyboard. Scribbling a quick diagram or making a few quick handwritten notes can convey some information much more effectively than a slab of text. That’s the reasoning behind Livescribe’s Pulse smartpen, a computer in the shape of a pen that not only digitally captures handwriting, but simultaneously records audio and synchronizes it to the writing to create what it calls “pencasts”. Now Livescribe is taking pencasts to the next level with a social media tool that enables them to be embedded within any website or blog. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Xerox sees big future in tiny printing package

By - May 12, 2009 3 Pictures
Although solid ink technology has been around for over a decade, solid ink printers have largely remained the domain of the graphic arts industry because they print more slowly and are unsuitable for higher volume printing. But Xerox has now firmly set its sights on the office market with its ColorQube 9200 Series multifunction printer, which uses new print head technology, with nozzles half the width of a human hair, to overcome past problems. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Golden-i Bluetooth headset with virtual PC display

By - May 11, 2009 5 Pictures
Mobile phones and laptop computers have made traditional 9-to-5 workdays a thing of the past for many workers. That ability to work from any location, however, can be a double-edged sword. The flexibility to be freed from the office also means that work is increasingly encroaching on people’s recreation time, as they find they are never really off the clock. That situation looks set to worsen, or improve, depending on your perspective, with the introduction of the Golden-i from Kopin Corporation. The Golden-i is a Bluetooth headset that provides a 15-inch virtual display with a hands-free, natural-speech-recognition interface for wireless remote control over a range of devices including mobile phones, PCs, company networks and wireless systems. Read More
— Automotive

Audi revs up and down with new stop-start technology

By - May 11, 2009 1 Picture
It may sound obvious, but the most effective way to cut a car's fuel consumption is to turn the car off. Of course that isn’t very useful if you're trying to get from A to B. But for many trips, particularly for city driving, a car can be idle for a significant amount of time. Such stop-start driving is far from being fuel-efficient, but Audi has turned that around with a new system that shuts down the engine when the car comes to a stop. The start-stop system joins a new on-board computer, as part of Audi’s modular efficiency platform, which is designed to reduce fuel consumption and cut carbon emissions. Read More
— Computers

Samsung’s 70 Series LCD monitors perfect for work and play

By - May 10, 2009 1 Picture
Samsung is definitely getting its money’s worth out of the manufacturing process that produces its proprietary high-gloss Touch of Color (ToC) finish. ToC can be found on everything from the company's latest TVs to its latest camcorders. Now computer monitors can be added to that list with the release of the 70 Series monitors. The new LCD monitors not only boast a crystal-like bezel with ToC finish, but also they feature the contrast and response of Samsung’s LCD TVs, making them ideal for watching TV as well as displaying the office spreadsheet or playing games. Read More
— Medical

Researchers develop smart monitoring device for brain injury

By - May 8, 2009 1 Picture
A multi-purpose “lab on a tube” developed by Engineers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) could provide significant advance in the treatment of traumatic brain injury. A serious knock on the head results in not only the initial damage, but a second wave of injury caused by swelling and lack of oxygen among other factors. Currently, the status of these injuries can only be intermittently examined, but the “lab on a tube” gives medicos the capability to continuously monitor crucial physiological characteristics. Read More
— Computers

LaCie releases new high capacity network storage drives

By - May 7, 2009 9 Pictures
With the advantage of freeing up a server to concentrate on tasks besides file serving, Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices have become an increasingly popular option for small offices and home users over the last few years. LaCie has two new high capacity NAS solutions for anyone considering going this route – the Big Disk Network and d2 Network. The d2 Network supports up to 1.5TB capacity, while the Big Disk Network combines two drives in a RAID 0 setting, for up to 4TBs of storage. Read More
— Computers

MSi gx laptops get turbo boost

By - May 7, 2009 2 Pictures
If there’s one button that could possibly be more tempting than “do not press”, it's the one with “turbo” written on it. Perhaps recognizing this MSi has included a turbo button on its new GX623 and GX633 laptops that ramps up the speed of the CPU when the laptops are connected to mains power. If instead you’re looking for reduced power consumption and longer battery life, MSi’s ECO Engine can cycle through a range of power setting tweaks at the touch of a button. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Panasonic 2009 TV range wrap-up

By - May 7, 2009 12 Pictures
Although LCD has been clearly outselling plasmas TVs in recent times, plasma still maintains a number of advantages over its rival format, most notably in contrast ratio. So while some manufacturers, such as Pioneer, have ceased making plasma panels, Panasonic is persisting, with plans to launch 11 new VIERA plasma models this year. Although the company understands the value of LCD, too, with nine LCD models included in the 2009 VIERA TV line-up. Read More
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