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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Wearable Electronics

Concept bra to help Japanese women on the hubbie hunt

By - May 19, 2009 8 Pictures
“Concept” and “bra” aren’t two words you’d typically expect to go together too often. After all, a bra is the epitome of simplicity. As Seinfeld's George Costanza once remarked, “Two cups in the front, two loops in the back. How do they do it?” Well, Japanese lingerie maker Triumph International has complicated the humble undergarment with its concept “Konkatsu bra” – a bra that is designed to help Japanese women search for husbands by proudly declaring they're on the hunt. Read More
— Around The Home

Demy digital recipe reader puts a world of dishes at your fingertips

By - May 18, 2009 6 Pictures
Looks like the Key Ingredient Corporation is looking to be to recipes what Apple is to music. Instead of iTunes, it has the keyingredient.com website that lets people either share recipes publicly or store them privately and, instead of an iPod, it has the Demy – a digital recipe reader – with 7-inch touchscreen and "kitchen safe" casing – that syncs with your online Key Ingredient account. Read More
— Medical

Radical tissue scaffold to treat knee injuries

By - May 16, 2009 1 Picture
Damage to knee cartilage is one of the more common types of sports injuries. Treatment often involves drilling a hole through the cartilage into the bone to stimulate the bone marrow to release stem cells, transplanting cartilage and the underlying bone from another part of the joint, or removing cartilage cells from the body, stimulating them to grow in the lab and re-implanting them. Now MIT engineers have built a new tissue scaffold that can stimulate bone and cartilage growth when transplanted into knees and other joints, potentially offering a more effective, less expensive – and painful – option to more conventional therapies. Read More
— Science

Putting the squeeze on crystals could see an end to computer boot stages

By - May 15, 2009 2 Pictures
Nobody likes staring at a screen while they wait for their computer to boot up. Sure, you can spend those few minutes making a cup of coffee or ferreting the dirt out from under your fingernails, but if you’re raring to go those few minutes can be a frustrating waste of time. This could soon be a thing of the past however, thanks to a clever materials science technique that may allow a new class of electronic devices that remember their last state, even after power is turned off. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Digital printing at 400 feet per minute

By - May 15, 2009 2 Pictures
It probably won’t fit on your home desktop, but HP’s Inkjet Web Press platform should appeal to print service providers looking to accelerate their transition from analog to digital printing. Offering four-color (CMYK) production printing at an addressable printing resolution of 1,200 x 600 dots per inch (dpi), the HP Inkjet Web Press can churn out prints at the rate of 400 feet (122m) per minute using the latest generation of HP Thermal Inkjet printheads based on the company's Scalable Printing Technology. Read More
— Sports

Suunto's new heart rate monitors - laboratory on a wrist

By - May 14, 2009 2 Pictures
Elite athletes know that training smarter is much better than training harder, and to do that you need to know exactly what's happening in your body. Suunto has introduced its new Triathlon collection heart rate monitors which measure the time interval between heartbeats and its variations to produce seven different body parameters as well as analyze these readings to provide the information needed to maximize their training efforts. Read More
— Science

Will nanocrystals dim OLED's bright light?

By - May 13, 2009 1 Picture
Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are just starting to appear in consumer electronics, such as Sony's OLED XEL-1 TV and the United Keys OLED Keypad, but barely have we been there five seconds and already scientists are talking up what could be OLED’s successor – a nanocrystal that constantly emits light, which may open the door to dramatically less expensive and more versatile lasers, brighter LED lighting and biological markers tracking how a drug interacts with a cell at a level never before possible. Read More
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