Advertisement
more top stories »

Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Electronics

CATSi - the world's smallest GPS, GSM and RF tracking device

By - June 24, 2009
The CATSi, (pronounced cat's eye), is designed to track almost anything, from pets and people through to cars, trucks and motorbikes. Although we’ve seen plently of GPS trackers before, CATS-i is touting the its new product as the world’s smallest, thinnest and most covert GPS, GSM and RF tracking device ever. This means the device can be used in products that have previously been inaccessible to GPS tracking - little Jimmy should have a hard time detecting a CATSi sewn into his jacket for example. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Homer Simpson tells you where to go

By - June 23, 2009
While the Knight Rider GPS by Mio lets drivers live out their boyhood fantasies, it may also bring on a slight superiority complex thanks to the refined tones of William Daniels. TomTom users won’t have that problem now that iconic cartoon everyman Homer Simpson is onboard to guide them to the nearest bar or donut shop. Read More
— Robotics

Robot does it by the book

By - June 22, 2009
Too tired to read the little ones a bedtime story after a long day? Japanese researchers may have had the time-poor parent in mind when they developed Ninomiya-kun, a robot capable of reading aloud from that most ancient of random access mass storage devices - a book. Read More
— Robotics

Squse robotic hand a soft touch

By - June 22, 2009
Kyoto-based factory automation firm Squse has developed a robotic hand that is dextrous and delicate enough to handle sushi. The scarily lifelike hand is constructed of a polycarbonate skeleton covered by a skin of soft silicone. Its 22 pneumatically powered artificial muscles enable its fingers to move like a human hand and it has 20 different moves up its sleeve, ranging from a full-hand squeeze to a delicate two-finger pinch used to transfer sushi from one plate to another. Read More
— Medical

Early detection of Alzheimer’s disease using x-rays

By - June 21, 2009 2 Pictures
A highly detailed x-ray imaging technique previously been used to examine tumors in breast tissue and cartilage in knee and ankle joints could used for early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory are the first to test the technique’s ability to visualize a class of minuscule plaques that are a hallmark feature of Alzheimer’s disease. Read More
— Games

Maingear Axess-HD Gamer: Get your game on in the living room

By - June 21, 2009
Maingear has added some gaming grunt to its line of high end Home Theater PCs (HTPCs) in the form the Axess-HD Gamer. Just like its stable mates, the Axess-HD and HD PRO, the HD Gamer sports a low profile design with aluminum case and optional OLED Front Panel Display that is designed to blend in with other home theater components. However, behind that stylish exterior lies a system built for gaming, an intention made more obvious by the inclusion of the Phantom Lapboard as standard. Read More
— Home Entertainment

LG entering OLED-TV market

By - June 19, 2009
The OLED TV market is ever so slowly heating up with the announcement from LG that it will launch a 15-inch OLED TV in the Korean market at the end of the year. LG first revealed a prototype 15-inch OLED TV at CES 2009 in January where it impressed with the incredible contrast and 0.8mm thin profile that OLED technology provides. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement