Highlights from the 2015 Geneva Motor Show

Darren Quick

The new study by researchers at the University of California looks beyond the exhaust pipe...

By looking at the environmental impact of passenger transport – whether it be trains, planes or automobiles – beyond the exhaust fumes spewing from its collective tail pipe, researchers in the United States have discovered a significant spike in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. By taking into account transport support systems – which includes sourcing raw materials, manufacturing, as well as the construction and maintenance of infrastructure – researchers at the University of California hope to provide a more detailed view for transport planners and policy makers. And produce a better outcome for the environment.  Read More

The Panasonic HDC-SD10

At just 0.5 lbs each, Panasonic's two new high definition (HD) camcorders are almost half the weight of the company's first AVCHD offering released in 2006 which tipped the scales at just under a pound. While a pound may not sound like much anyway, any weight loss in a device that may need to be carried at eye level for extended periods of time is good news for tired arms everywhere.  Read More

Toshiba's flagship REGZA SV670 series

Toshiba’s flagship REGZA SV670 series that first caught our eye at CES 2009 is set to hit stores alongside the REGZA XV648 and ZV650 series. The SV670 is Toshiba’s first-ever LED-backlit HDTV and incorporates the company's FocaLight Full Matrix LED with local dimming instead of the standard edge LED lighting used in many other LED TVs. This ability to turn off individual groups of LEDs where required allows the SV670 to achieve deep blacks without sacrificing peak brightness and according to Toshiba, delivers a dynamic contrast ration of 2,000,000:1.  Read More

RoBe:Do's Three software-ready autonomous robot

RoBe:Do Robotics has rolled its latest software-ready autonomous robot off the production line at its Colorado home base. Like its first two robotic offerings, RoBe:Do’s third robot, aptly named “Three”, comes fully assembled and ready for you to add the netbook of your choice to act as the robot’s brain... and making and delivering popcorn could be just the tip of the iceberg for this bot.  Read More

Kopin’s tiny CyberDisplay VGA display compared to the size of a U.S. dime

While most of the focus is on bigger and bigger displays, microdisplay manufacturer, Kopin, has gone in the opposite direction, producing the world’s smallest 600 x 480 resolution VGA color-filter LCD. The tiny display, which measures just 0.27-inches diagonally, was made possible by shrinking the color dots down to a mere 2.9 x 8.7µm (microns) - to put that in perspective a strand of human hair is about 100 microns wide.  Read More

A graphene material sample. Pic credit: Georgia Tech/Gary Meek

Graphene, the one-atom-thick gauze of carbon atoms resembling chicken wire first isolated in 2004, continues to find new and wondrous applications. It has already been used to create the world’s smallest transistor and now researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have experimentally demonstrated the potential for graphene to replace copper for interconnects in future generations of integrated circuits.  Read More

The Econo-Keys EK-76-TP, keyboard on top, touchpad on the back

Like it or loathe it, the keyboard still reigns supreme as the king of computer input devices. With the netbooks of today manufacturers are faced with striking a balance between size and functionality. Some go for the full-sized keyboard that sacrifices some keys, while others simply opt for smaller keyboards. Neither solution suits everybody though, which is where portable keyboards like the EK-76-TP come in. But it's not just extra keys that set this unit apart - it's the surprising location of the trackpad.  Read More

A prototype scanner developed by British scientists could free police from the time-consum...

Recent advances in body scanning technology such as the BodySearch personnel inspection system might be fine for airports, but are a bit too big to be an option for cops on the beat who are forced to identify criminals carrying guns and knives the old fashioned way. A prototype scanner developed by British scientists could free police from the time-consuming and often dangerous practice of stop and search by using electro magnetic waves in order to pick up ‘reflections’ from concealed guns, gun barrels or knives without the need to be close to the subject.  Read More

Sunlight prompts the newly developed molecular nanomotor to unclasp in this artist’s illus...

Most solar powered motors require an intermediate step where the light is converted to electricity or heat, usually by a photovoltaic cell, before it can be used to drive the motor. But now a team of University of Florida chemists have developed a new type of “molecular nanomotor” that bypasses this step and transforms light directly into motion – albeit on a very tiny scale.  Read More

Snow Leopard may look like Leopard, but packs some performance improvements

Since Snow Leopard, aka OS X 10.6, was previewed at last year's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) Mac users have been waiting patiently for release details. Now, courtesy of this year’s WWDC, they have them. With most of the improvements of the under-the-hood variety, the upgrade for Mac OS Leopard users will be available from September at the Global Financial Crisis friendly price of USD$29.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 31,275 articles
Editor's Choice
Product Comparisons