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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Mobile Technology

Samsung watch phone calls in early

Looks like Samsung is going to beat LG to the punch with the release of its S9110 watch phone due to hit stores before the rival LG GD910 – in France anyway. Aimed at Dick Tracy fans and gadget lovers alike the S9110 even manages to squeeze a few more features into its diminutive body, including a larger 1.76-inch touchscreen (to the GD910’s 1.43-inch), Bluetooth 2.1 and Outlook email sync. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Orb Bluetooth headset redefines the ear-ring

Although Bluetooth headsets have come a long way in the style stakes, you can still look and feel a bit like a dork getting about town with one permanently affixed to your ear. Also, since they are usually designed to mold to the shape of the ear, they can be a little awkward to stuff in a pocket when not in use. An innovative new Bluetooth headset called the Orb solves this problem by transforming from a wireless earpiece into a ring that can be worn on your finger. Read More
— Computers

Is this the world's most expensive (and annoying) 16GB Flash drive?

If there’s one thing you could expect to rely on when it comes to Flash memory it’s that as capacities increase over time, prices decrease. It’s a rule that has been borne out over the years and its continuation has been a source of comfort that everything is right with the world. Now Japan’s Solid Alliance has thrown our world askew with the release of the Mnemosyne, a 16GB flash drive that is yours for the paltry sum of one million yen (approx. USD$10,000.) Read More
— Medical

Possible cure for radiation sickness discovered?

According to a report in the Israeli newspaper, Yediot Ahronoth, US and Israeli researchers have developed a drug that offers protection from the damaging effects of radiation sickness. The medication could not only provide effective protection in the event of a nuclear or “dirty bomb” attack, but it could also enable cancer patients to be treated with more powerful doses of radiation. Read More
— Around The Home

Eternaleds' liquid-cooled LED light bulb

Liquid-cooled PCs are a mainstay for PC enthusiasts looking to eek every last bit of performance from their beloved machines and now it seems this approach has reached the world of the LED light bulb. A company called Eternaleds has introduced the HydraLux-4 LED Bulb, the world’s first LED light bulb to use "liquid-cooling technology" to give a true 360-degree light like a regular incandescent light bulb. Read More
— Computers

Share your point of view with the EVGA InterView 1700 Dual-Panel Display

For users who find that one display is never enough and can’t afford the NEC CRV43, EVGA has released the InterView 1700 Dual-Monitor system. The unit consists of two side-by-side 17-inch widescreen LCD monitors suspended on a central frame, which houses a built-in 1.3MP webcam, built-in microphone, and three port USB 2.0 hub. With a supported graphics card the dual displays can be set up as a span to provide an extended desktop, or cloned to allow one display to be flipped 180 degrees for easy viewing by a second person on the opposite side of the desk. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Holographic laser projection technology to transform any surface into a touch screen

Light Blue Optics (LBO) has received an injection of funds to further its development of, among other things, a holographic laser projection technology. The big news is that this technology can be touch-enabled, meaning any flat surface, such as a table, can be instantly transformed into a touch-sensitive display, eliminating the need for a touch screen and allowing users to directly interact with multimedia content. Read More
— Computers

LG's XF1 external multimedia HDD looks the part

Those looking for a way to get movies and other digital media stored on a PC from the study onto the TV in the lounge have a few choices open to them. These include burning the content to CD or DVD, sending the content wirelessly to a media streamer or transporting the content on a USB drive. Those looking at the latter option have a new drive from LG to consider in the form of the XF1, which sports HDMI and composite outputs for direct connection to a TV. Read More
— Music

Bose announces SoundLink wireless music system

The digitization of music has seen many people’s music collections move from the CD rack to the hard drive. Although the computer is a great place to store music, it can limit the listening experience thanks to the less than stellar speakers that are often tied to it. Bose has unveiled its new designed for people who want to listen to music stored on their computer, but don’t necessarily want to be at their computer to enjoy it - the SoundLink wireless music system. Read More
— Environment

Capturing more heat from low-temp resources to aid geothermal power

Geothermal power is cost effective, reliable, and environmentally friendly, but it has previously been limited to geographic areas near tectonic plate boundaries. New technologies, such as that employed in the Raser low-temperature binary geothermal plant, promise to expand the opportunities for geothermal plants. Now scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have devised a method for capturing significantly more heat from low-temperature geothermal resources to further boost the possibility of virtually pollution-free electricity. Read More