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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Home Entertainment

Logitech unveils four new 360-Degree Sound multimedia speaker systems

By - July 16, 2009 6 Pictures
Logitech has announced four new multimedia speaker systems featuring omnidirectional acoustics for a wider sound sweet spot. Unlike standard PC speakers that use forward-firing drivers, the four new Logitech multimedia speaker systems feature 360-Degree Sound courtesy of the forward and backwards facing drivers found in each satellite. Logitech claims this allows sound to be transmitted more consistently over a wider space to provide better sound when you drag yourself away from the desk. Read More
— Around The Home

The Amana Jot Refrigerator makes a cool noticeboard

By - July 15, 2009
There’s no doubt the refrigerator is the central hub of the kitchen, serving more than its primary purpose of keeping things cold. In recent years we’ve seen fridge manufacturers pack their products with all manner of technological additions, from iPod docks to touch screens and TVs. In most households though, the humble fridge remains a central place to stick notes that are sure to be seen. Whirlpool has saved us the hassle of hunting for a scrap of paper on which to scribble such missives with the Amana Jot refrigerator. Read More
— Environment

The M3 mobile water desalination system cuts the cost of producing clean water

By - July 15, 2009 3 Pictures
Desalination is a popular source of potable water in Middle Eastern countries, where large energy reserves and the relative scarcity of water suitable for drinking led to desalination in the region accounting for close to 75% of total world capacity in 2007. If that figure hasn’t already dropped it almost certainly will as access to clean water becomes an issue for many places around the globe. And the shortage isn’t just limited to developing countries, with places like California and parts of Australia facing their worst droughts in recorded history. A new mini-mobile-modular (M3) “smart” water desalination and filtration system could help determine the feasibility of desalination in areas that may be considering it for the first time. Read More
— Games

Novel design opens door for ping pong fans

By - July 15, 2009 3 Pictures
If you think doors are wasted simply as a barrier to keep people out and you fancy your hand at the occasional bout of table tennis, albeit on a reduced scale, then a novel design by Tobias Fränzel might be right up your alley. The Ping Pong Door transforms a normal everyday door into a ping-pong table and back again in seconds. Read More
— Digital Cameras

New technique reduces processing power needed for facial recognition

By - July 14, 2009
The human brain has an amazing capacity for recognizing patterns, particularly faces. While we are able to differentiate different faces with apparent ease, computer facial recognition systems have a much harder time of it, relying on powerful computers and complex models to accurately identify the majority of differences between faces. This has held facial recognition systems back from being widely adopted, but now researchers at Florida Atlantic University (FAU) have developed a technique that significantly reduces the amount of computer power required without compromising accuracy. Read More
— Robotics

Learning robot puts on a happy face

By - July 14, 2009
Robots generally aren’t the most expressive of entities, but their faces are becoming increasingly realistic as the number of artificial muscles controlling them rises. Today, a highly trained person must manually set up these kinds of realistic robots so that the servos pull in the right combination to make specific facial expressions, but researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) are looking to automate the process by giving robots the ability to learn realistic facial expressions. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Samsung’s folding wings keyboard design for mobile devices

By - July 13, 2009
The ever-decreasing size of mobile devices might be a godsend for the pocket, but it poses problems for keyboard input. There have been a variety of solutions looking to solve the problem, from the iPhone’s onscreen keyboard to the Virtual Keyboard (VKB) that projects a keyboard onto any flat surface. One of the problems with these kinds of keyboards, however, is the lack of tactile feedback afforded by pressing actual buttons. Shrinking the keyboard down to fit on a mobile device of course presents its own problems and manufacturers must weigh size against usability by the chubby fingered. Samsung may have a solution with a folding wing design that would allow a reasonably sized keyboard to fold out from the rear of a mobile device. Read More
— Electronics

Vikuiti Rear Projection Film turns shop windows into very big screen TVs

By - July 13, 2009
Taking a stroll through your average city shopping precinct will see you bombarded with a plethora of advertising messages. Making their particular message cut through the visual noise can be a tough prospect for advertisers and plain old billboards and static signs just don’t seem to cut the mustard anymore. Those looking to grab people’s attention might want to take a look at 3M’s Vikuiti Rear Projection Film, which can be laminated onto transparent glass or plastic to act as an eye-catching rear projection screen. Read More
— Computers

Shhhh! Silent Keyboard EX cuts the keyboard clatter

By - July 13, 2009 4 Pictures
Writers often keep odd hours and the constant click-clack of keys on a keyboard is likely to annoy any partner within earshot trying to catch some shuteye. Such sleep deprived housemates are likely to be thankful for the Thanko Silent Keyboard EX that cuts the noise down to a mere 44.5 dB, which is 16.5 dB quieter than your average keyboard and roughly the sound level of a quiet library. Read More
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