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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Energy

Canadian startup proposes nuclear fusion power plant at a bargain price

Nuclear fusion offers a completely clean method of producing vast amounts of energy. So far the major stumbling block for scientists has been creating a controllable fusion reaction that achieves “net gain”, meaning it gives off more energy than is needed to trigger it. But Canadian startup, General Fusion, is claiming it can build a relatively low-tech prototype nuclear fusion power plant within the next decade for less than a billion dollars. Read More
— Environment

MotionPower energy system testing expanded

When we first came across MotionPower, a prototype system that converts the kinetic energy from cars driving over it into electricity, we mentioned we would keep tabs on the technology to see if it could make the leap to real world implementation. Well, the company behind the MotionPower system, New Energy Technologies, has taken the next step along that road by expanding the durability field tests of the device. Read More
— Science

If Dali had a supercomputer: amazing supernova rendering

Capturing complex visualizations, such as the above Dali-esque rendering of a supernova, don’t just produce pretty pictures ideal for desktop wallpapers. They also allow scientists to see simulations of complex physical, chemical and biological phenomena. Unfortunately generating the quadrillions of data points required for visualizations of everything from supernovas to protein structures is quickly overwhelming current computing capabilities. So scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are exploring ways to speed up the process using a technique called software-based parallel volume rendering. Read More
— Home Entertainment

LG unveils new slimline LCD and LED HDTVs

LG has unveiled its newest LCD and LED HDTVs at its annual Summer Line Show in New York. It sounds more like a fashion show than a platform for launching consumer electronics, but given that the new TVs’ main selling points are more in the looks rather than the specs department, perhaps it is. Both the SL80 (LCD) and SL90 (LED) series comprise FullHD 1080p resolution units featuring a single edge-to-edge panel of glass over a slim bezel, which incorporates an Invisible Speaker design to give the units a clean seamless look. Read More
— Science

Reality Mining: Tomorrow’s forecast predicts humanity’s needs

Researchers will one day be able to accurately predict such things as the economic and social effects of billions of new Internet users in China and India, or the exact location and number of airline flights to cancel around the world in order to halt the spread of a pandemic, says Indiana University’s Alessandro Vespignani. This capability will be possible thanks to “reality mining”, which involves the collection of data from machine-sensed sources to provide knowledge about aggregated human behavior. Read More
— Music

Belkin's solution to the iPod shuffle dilemma

The headphones Apple includes with its range of iPods have never been a major selling point. Sure, they do the job, but many people choose to scrap Apple’s trademark-white earbuds in favor of higher quality units. That was why many people cried foul when Apple released the third generation iPod Shuffle, which features controls located on the headphone cable. Belkin has released a new headphone adapter that restores your ability to listen to the Shuffle on headphones of your own choosing. Read More
— Science

Monitoring blogs to measure global happiness

A mathematician and computer scientist working in the Advanced Computing Center at the University of Vermont have created a remote-sensing mechanism that examines the content of blogs to measure the emotional levels of millions of people. The result is the ‘We Feel Fine’ system, which purports to give an indication of how people around the world are feeling. Read More
— Environment

Vertical Landscapes: The only way is up for green cities

Demand for office and housing space in ever diminishing land space has led to taller and taller buildings reaching for the skies in cities around the world. This shortage of land in many cities has unfortunately also led to a scarcity of natural vegetation in urban settings. We’ve looked at several vertical-farming concepts - dedicated buildings that provide space to grow crops in city centers - but a new architectural system from Vertical Landscapes (VL) seeks to invite nature back into our cities on a broader scale. The architectural system transforms buildings into columns of vegetation to add a much needed touch of green, help clean the city air and possibly even produce small scale crops, all while retaining the building’s usual use for office or housing space. Read More
— Science

Bacterial computers move towards feasibility

Last year we looked at how a research team had genetically engineered Escherichia coli, (E. coli), bacteria to solve a classic mathematical puzzle known as the burnt pancake problem. At the time the researchers indicated their intention to adapt 'bacterial computers' for other, related math problems, and it appears they’ve been true to their word by solving another classic mathematical problem, the Hamiltonian Path Problem. Read More
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