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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Home Entertainment

IMAX and TCL team up for first home IMAX Private Theater "Palais" system

By - June 17, 2015 2 Pictures

Back in 2013, plans were announced to bring the IMAX experience into homes with IMAX Private Theater. Now the first in-home IMAX system developed through a joint venture with TCL has been unveiled in China. But don't go changing the plans for your rumpus room just yet, as you need to qualify just to get a look at the showroom where the luxury system is being demonstrated.

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— Science

Simple and cheap tunable gripper inspired by the gecko

By - June 17, 2015

A few months ago, we reported on the development of a material that uses the same technique employed by gecko feet to allow its adhesion to be turned on and off at will. This allows fragile components, like those used in the manufacture of semiconductors, to be carefully picked up and put down without suction or residue-leaving adhesives. Now researchers at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) have developed a gripper, also inspired by the gecko and also tunable, that they claim is much simpler, making it easy and cheap to mass produce.

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— Games

FTC takes action against crowdfunding fraudster

By - June 15, 2015 2 Pictures

Contributing to a crowdfunding campaign is inherently risky. Even when the intentions of those responsible for the projects are honorable, a project can easily fall over, potentially leaving contributors out of pocket. But in its first legal action against a crowdfunded project, the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has gone after the project creator of a Kickstarter campaign who pocketed most of the money contributed by backers.

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— Electronics

Samsung targets retailers with Mirror and Transparent OLED panels

By - June 12, 2015 2 Pictures

Transparent and reflective displays might look cool, but in terms of the home, their applications are limited. However, bricks and mortar shops looking for some technological wizardry to get shoppers through the door are a different proposition. So it should come as no surprise that Samsung chose this week's Retail Asia Expo 2015 in Hong Kong to unveil the first commercial use of its Mirror and Transparent OLEDs.

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— Computers

Synaptics SmartBar brings capacitive touch capabilities to the spacebar

By - June 4, 2015 2 Pictures

Numerous manufacturers have been integrating touchpads into keyboards for a while now – some of which even boast touch panels that that allow switching between different modes. But San Jose-based Synaptics is taking touch technology where it has never been before. Its SmartBar technology turns the spacebar into a touch interface that is always within thumb's reach.

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— Science

Could "brainprints" replace passwords, fingerprints and retinal scans?

By - June 3, 2015

Passwords are the bane of many a computer user's existence. Experts recommend long strings of characters containing a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers and symbols that may be difficult to crack, but can also be difficult to remember. Despite there being simple techniques for creating difficult-to-crack passwords that are easy to remember and horror stories of identify theft abound, the top two most common passwords remain "12345" and "password". But a study out of Binghampton University in New York suggests brainwaves could be a promising alternative to verify a user's identity.

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— Electronics

"Designer carbon" bodes well for enhanced energy-storage

By - June 1, 2015

Activated carbon is a form of carbon that is shot through with nanosized holes that increase the material's surface area and allow it to catalyze more chemical reactions and store more electrical charge. But due to the way it is produced, most of the pores within it aren't interconnected, limiting the material's ability to transport electricity. Now researchers at Stanford University have created a "designer carbon" with greater pore connectivity and therefore greater electronic conductivity, which enables superior energy-storage performance.

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— Aircraft

First manned flight for Flike personal tricopter

By - May 28, 2015 5 Pictures

Despite always generating plenty of interest, getting a personal flight vehicle off the ground can be a huge undertaking – just ask Malloy Aeronautics, which has been forced to scale its Hoverbike down, selling a one-third-scale drone to raise funds to continue development of the larger, manned Hoverbike. But a Hungarian team is looking onwards and upwards after having achieved the first manned flight of its Flike tricopter concept demonstrator.

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