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Darren Quick

Darren Quick

Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.

— Space

Lunar detour could lighten the launch load for manned missions to Mars

Early last year, researchers at MIT floated the idea of "gas stations" in space that have the potential to cut the costs of future missions to the Moon considerably. Now a new study out of MIT says that, although possibly a little out of the way, the Moon would make a worthwhile refueling pit stop for manned missions to Mars by reducing the mass of a launch from Earth by 68 percent.

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— Automotive

Garmin babyCam merges GPS navigation and back seat video monitoring

Cameras have made it easy for drivers to keep a recording of the road ahead and reverse without craning their necks around. Now Garmin is letting drivers more easily keep an eye on the back seat with its new babyCam. While in-vehicle video monitors aren’t new, Garmin’s is the first to work in conjunction with an existing GPS navigator display – as long as it’s one of the compatible models from Garmin.

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— Aircraft

Airbus A350-900ULR to fly world’s longest commercial passenger route

Any masochists who think spending just under 17 hours on a flight from Dallas/Fort Worth to Sydney just isn’t long enough are set to get a chance to test their endurance further. Airbus is to supply Singapore Airlines with seven Ultra-Long Range versions of its A350-900 that can fly for up to 19 hours non-stop, allowing the airline to relaunch direct flights between Singapore and the US, including New York.

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— Smartwatches

LG Watch Urbane 2nd Edition stands alone with addition of cellular connectivity

The current batch of Android Wear smartwatches may pack their share of smarts, but they all rely on a paired smartphone or Wi-Fi for connectivity. LG is breaking the tether with its LG Watch Urbane 2nd Edition, which is set to be the first Android Wear device to boast in-built cellular connectivity for a data connection or taking calls without a smartphone.

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— Aircraft

Onward and very much upward after Perlan Mission II's maiden flight

The Perlan Mission II glider, which is designed to fly higher than the U-2 spy plane and SR-71 Blackbird, has made its maiden flight. The aircraft separated from its towplane at an altitude of 5,000 feet above Roberts Field at Redmond Municipal Airport in Oregon, but is expected to go much higher next year when it makes a world altitude record attempt to the edge of space.

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— Automotive

Volkswagen admits "defeat device" used to circumvent US emissions tests

Volkswagen and its subsidiary Audi may currently be in Frankfurt showcasing their wares, but the attention of the boardrooms of both companies is likely to be elsewhere. The US EPA has issued Volkswagen AG, Audi AG, and Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. with a notice of violation (NOV) of the Clean Air Act by running software in their vehicles that turns full emissions controls on only when undergoing official emissions testing.

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— Bicycles

Lumenus smart jacket signals a change of direction for cyclists

Visibility is a crucial part of cyclist safety, but it's also important that their turning intentions are relayed to other road users. Hand signals were the only option in this area for a long time, but in recent years we've seen technology, such as the Zackees cycling gloves, designed to improve the visibility of turn signals at night. The Lumenus jacket on display at Interbike takes a similar approach, but goes a step further by letting cyclists be guided by the light.

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— Wearables

Responsive sports bra opens up when things get hot and sweaty

Bras can be pretty uncomfortable items of apparel – or so I'm reliably informed. And while bras worn for show in the bedroom often have plenty of ventilation, those worn on the sporting field for support often don't. To show off the potential for its Curie module, Intel teamed up with architectural sportswear designer Chromat to produce two "responsive garments" – a bra and a dress – which change shape is response to the wearer's body temperature, adrenaline or stress levels.

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