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Dario Borghino

Dario Borghino

Dario studied software engineering at the Polytechnic University of Turin. When he isn't writing for Gizmag he is usually traveling the world on a whim, working on an AI-guided automated trading system, or chasing his dream to become the next European thumbwrestling champion.

— Around The Home

Smaller, more powerful Nomiku packs Wi-Fi to make sous-vide cooking easier

By - August 18, 2014 6 Pictures
With the goal of making sous-vide cooking more user friendly, the team responsible for the Nomiku immersion circulator have added Wi-Fi to a new model that is smaller and more powerful. Thanks to a Wi-Fi connection, the device can now be controlled remotely and recipes can be browsed, shared and tested more easily using the accompanying smartphone app. Read More
— Science

Add salt to significantly extend the life of lithium-based batteries

By - August 18, 2014
Salt has long been used to preserve meat, and now researchers at Cornell University have found that adding certain salts to the anodes of lithium-based batteries can also increase their useful life by a very large factor, solving long-standing problems associated with cell degradation. The advance can be adapted to other metal-based chemistries, including the lighter and more energy dense lithium-sulfur cells and, according to the researchers, might see commercial applications in as little as three years. Read More
— Science

Liquid metal alloy electrode boosts potential of sodium-beta batteries

By - August 17, 2014 3 Pictures
A new battery electrode designed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) combines liquid-state cesium and sodium to dramatically improve on the efficiency, safety and useful life of sodium-beta batteries (NBBs). If the technology is scaled up successfully, the advance could help build a smart electric grid that makes better use of renewables such as solar and wind. Read More
— Space

NASA says puzzling new space drive can generate thrust without propellant

By - August 2, 2014 6 Pictures
A NASA study has recently concluded that the "Cannae Drive," a disruptive new method of space propulsion, can produce small amounts of thrust without the use of propellant, in apparent discordance with Newton's third law. According to its inventor, the device can harness microwave radiation inside a resonator, turning electricity into a net thrust. If further verified and perfected, the advance could revolutionize the space industry, dramatically cutting costs for both missions in deep space and satellites in Earth orbit. Read More
— Science

Gold nanomotors clocked at a record 150,000 RPM

By - July 23, 2014
Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have discovered that a gold nanorod submerged in water and exposed to high-frequency ultrasound waves can spin at an incredible speed of 150,000 RPM, about ten times faster than the previous record. The advance could lead to powerful nanomotors with important applications in medicine, high-speed machining, and the mixing of materials. Read More
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