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Dario Borghino

An Arizona-based company is planning to offer commercial subspace balloon flights by 2016 ...

Arizona-based World View Enterprises has successfully completed its first test flight of a space tourism balloon that, for the price of US$75,000 per person, will lift six passengers into the stratosphere to an altitude of 20 miles (32 km). From there, they will be able to see the curvature of the Earth. The company says it is on track to fly its first passenger in just two years time.  Read More

In its low-drag configuration, the 'smorph' looks like a golf ball (Image: MIT)

Researchers at MIT have developed a smart curved surface that can morph at will to reduce drag, generating a series of small, evenly spaced dimples that make it resemble the outside of a golf ball. This technology could be used to reduce hurricane damage on some public buildings, as well as increase the aerodynamic and fuel efficiency in cars.  Read More

A new design for multicore processors advanced at MIT solves the problem of cache coherenc...

Researchers at MIT are experimenting with a radically new design for multicore microchips that takes hints from the way internet routers work to make data flow between cores faster and more reliably. The ideas are now being put to the test on an innovative 36-core chip that might soon see commercial applications.  Read More

A  large, distributed network of concentrated solar power plants in desert regions could r...

Researchers at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) have conducted a study to examine the potential for solar power to provide reliable electricity around the clock, every day of the year. The team found that a large, distributed network of concentrated solar power (CSP) plants in the Mediterranean basin or the Kalahari desert in southern Africa would be able to consistently run at 80 percent of maximum capacity or more throughout the year regardless of time of day, season, or weather conditions.  Read More

Researchers at the University of Queensland have simulated the behavior of a photon travel...

Researchers at the University of Queensland, Australia claim to have simulated the behavior of a single photon traveling back in time and interacting with an older version of itself, in an effort to investigate how such a particle would behave. Their results suggest that, under such circumstances, the laws of quantum mechanics would stretch to become even more bizarre than they already are.  Read More

The Cliris automatic eyewear cleaner (Photo: Cliris)

If you've ever felt like pampering your eyeglasses but never knew how, this one may be for you. Swiss startup Cliris SA has taken to Kickstarter to fund the development of Cliris, a sleek-looking, automatic eyewear cleaner that uses ultrasound technology and a biodegradable solution to clean, disinfect, anti-fog treat, dry and (optionally) scent your spectacles in only four minutes.  Read More

The new technology could allow lithium-ion batteries to charge 16 times faster than presen...

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have developed a silicon anode that would allow us to charge lithium-ion batteries up to 16 times faster than is currently possible. The new design relies on a three-dimensional, cone-shaped cluster of carbon nanotubes that could also result in batteries that hold about 60 percent more charge while being 40 percent lighter.  Read More

A new brain-controlled robotic exoskeleton will allow a paraplegic person to kick off the ...

On June 12th, the FIFA 2014 World Cup in Brazil will be kicked off by a paralyzed person using a highly innovative brain-controlled robotic exoskeleton. This feat is being carried out as a demonstration of the current state-of-the art in assisted mobility technology, as the researchers involved – part of the "Walk Again Project" – work toward refining their invention.  Read More

A new type of quantum dot could lead to cheaper solar cells and better satellite communica...

Researchers at the University of Toronto have manufactured and tested a new type of colloidal quantum dots (CQD), that, unlike previous attempts, doesn't lose performance as they keep in contact with oxygen. The development could lead to much cheaper or even spray-on solar cells, as well as better LEDs, lasers and weather satellites.  Read More

According to a survey conducted by astronomers at Cornell University, the Milky Way may be...

A survey conducted by astronomers at Cornell University has taken into account the characteristics of 637 known exoplanets and elaborated a Biological Complexity Index (BCI) to assess the relative probability of finding complex life on them. Their data supports the view that as many as one hundred million planets scattered around the Milky Way, and perhaps more, could support life beyond the microbial stage.  Read More

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