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Chris Wood

Chris Wood

Chris specializes in mobile technology for Gizmag, but also likes to dabble in the latest gaming gadgets. He has a degree in Politics and Ancient History from the University of Exeter, and lives in Gloucestershire, UK. In his spare time you might find him playing music, following a variety of sports or binge watching Game of Thrones.

— Aircraft

Airbus patent shows modular, removable aircraft cabins

According to a recently-granted patent, Airbus is exploring the potential of creating a new breed of versatile, modular aircraft that would see detachable passenger cabins slot into a hole in an aeroplane's fuselage. The concept has the potential to revolutionize air travel, while providing significant savings for airlines by reducing the time that planes spend idle on the ground.

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— Medical

Scientists identify protein central to cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease

A study from researchers at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco has examined the protein BRCA1, using a combination of tests on laboratory mice and human brain tissue to determine that the protein is central to learning and retaining memories. The work highlights the importance of the protein in relation to the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease, and could help in the development of future treatments.

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— Space

Novel theory explains carbon levels in the modern Martian atmosphere

Scientists believe that Mars once played host to a much warmer and wetter climate, but for that to be the case it must have once had a thicker atmosphere. There's a big problem with that theory, though, with detected levels of carbon not playing nice with atmospheric loss theories. Now, a joint team from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) believes it may have solved the problem, with a new theory that explains the issue by means of two simultaneous mechanisms.

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— Biology

Altering the physiological circuits of flatworms makes them grow the heads of other species

A new research project at Tufts University in Massachusetts has seen biologists successfully induce flatworms of a specific species to grow the head and brain you'd expect to find on another species. Not only does the breakthrough add to our understanding of exactly what governs the growth of anatomy, but the knowledge gained may also have practical uses down the line, helping us better understand and even fix birth defects.

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