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Chris Wood

3D Printing

3D Fashion project set to revolutionize clothing industry

A new partnership between Loughborough University in the UK and garment manufacturer the Yeh Group aims to kick 3D printed fashion into gear. The idea is to cut out the waste of the clothing industry and hopefully arrive at the project's eventual goal, which is to provide a system for personalized, printed polymer clothing that takes just 24 hours to produce.Read More

Medical

Non-invasive treatment produces 98 percent prostate cancer cure rate

Traditional approaches to tackling prostate cancer are generally quite effective, with a 80 to 90 percent cure rate, but a new method, known as Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) could revolutionize the practice. The results of an extensive five-year study have now been published, showing that the method, which requires far fewer hospital visits than conventional radiation therapy, has a cure rate of 98.6 percent.Read More

Electronics

Precise embroidered circuits bring next-gen smart clothing closer to reality

From sweat-sensing wristbands to electrode-embedded workout suits, new innovations in smart clothing are coming thick and fast. Now, Ohio State University researchers have made another big breakthrough, managing to create embroidered circuits using metallic thread that's just 0.1 mm thick. By embedding different patterns, the tech could be used to create everything from a t-shirt that boosts your cellphone signal, to a hat that tracks brain activity.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Newly identified biomarkers flag potential for better asthma diagnosis and treatment

Asthma is a disease that affects some 25 million people in the US alone, but there's currently no definitive test for diagnosing it. New research could change that, with scientists at the Penn State College of Medicine identifying molecules that circulate in patients' blood, signalling that they have the disease. Not only could the breakthrough lead to a new diagnostic test, but it could also allow for the development of new, more targeted treatments.Read More

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