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Chris Wood

Medical

Tool matches cancer genetics to approved treatments

When treating cancer, it's difficult to know whether a chosen treatment is proving effective. While new breakthroughs may give doctors faster indications of whether drugs are working, by the time a new treatment is attempted, it might be too late to achieve a positive outcome. A new tool, developed by researchers at the University of Colorado, could have a big impact on which treatment doctors decide to use, using data from whole exome sequencing to pick out drugs likely to prove effective at tackling tumors on a case-by-case basis.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Using smartphones and the cloud to diagnose ear infections

Ear infections are extremely common, with five out of every six children experiencing one before they're three years old. But in developing countries, the lack of trained personnel means that they're often misdiagnosed, or missed completely. A new tool developed by researchers at the Umea University in Sweden, in collaboration with scientists at the University of Pretoria in South Africa, is designed to leverage the power of smartphones and the cloud, making accurate diagnoses easier and more widely available.Read More

Medical

Nanoparticle "cluster bombs" could provide less toxic chemotherapy

Doctors have been using the chemotherapy drug cisplatin for decades, but significant toxic side effects – which can affect everything from the kidneys to the inner ear – limit its effectiveness as a treatment. A new method, which makes use of innovative nanoparticles, could change that, providing a "cluster bomb" approach to delivery that shows signs of being significantly less toxic to the patient.Read More

Medical

Nanoparticle shows if cancer treatment is working, ASAP

Knowing whether a therapy is working effectively is extremely important when treating cancer. That information can have a big impact, potentially prompting a change in treatment and improving its outcome. Right now, we don't have a method of detecting whether a tumor is reacting to medication until numerous cycles of therapy have been completed, but research by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) could change that, with a new nanoparticle treatment providing the information in as little as eight hours.Read More

Medical

Improved understanding of genetics offers new hope for diabetics

Diabetes is a widespread health problem, affecting some 400 million people across the planet. With that number only set to rise, it's important that we find new treatments as quickly as possible. Researchers at the University of Montreal are making significant progress in that regard, discovering a common genetic defect in beta cells that may be a big factor in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.Read More

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