Advertisement

Chris Wood

Electronics

Precise embroidered circuits bring next-gen smart clothing closer to reality

From sweat-sensing wristbands to electrode-embedded workout suits, new innovations in smart clothing are coming thick and fast. Now, Ohio State University researchers have made another big breakthrough, managing to create embroidered circuits using metallic thread that's just 0.1 mm thick. By embedding different patterns, the tech could be used to create everything from a t-shirt that boosts your cellphone signal, to a hat that tracks brain activity.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Newly identified biomarkers flag potential for better asthma diagnosis and treatment

Asthma is a disease that affects some 25 million people in the US alone, but there's currently no definitive test for diagnosing it. New research could change that, with scientists at the Penn State College of Medicine identifying molecules that circulate in patients' blood, signalling that they have the disease. Not only could the breakthrough lead to a new diagnostic test, but it could also allow for the development of new, more targeted treatments.Read More

Space

Evidence of an exoplanetary system was recorded in 1917

While the search for exoplanets has only comparatively recently picked up steam, a chance re-examination of an old astronomical glass plate has shown that the very first evidence of an exoplanetary system was actually recorded almost 100 years ago. The data on the plate doesn't outright confirm exoplanets in the system, but astronomers are confident that it's only a matter of time before their existence in such systems is confirmed. Read More

Space

A better tool for more accurate planet hunting

A new calibration tool developed by researchers at the Carnegie Institute is set to have a big impact in the hunt for exoplanets. The technology allows astronomers to use a longer wavelength of light when analyzing distant stars, making it possible to pick out false positives in results.Read More

Medical

Looking to love handles to treat diabetes

If a patient has Type 1 diabetes, then their ability to produce insulin is inhibited, usually by a loss of beta cells in the pancreas. Researchers have been looking at ways to replace the lost population of cells, but the process is difficult, often requiring the patient's immune system to be suppressed in order to be effective. Now, researchers at ETH Zurich have made a big breakthrough, successfully creating functional beta cells using stem cells extracted from the fatty tissue of a 50 year-old patient.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning

    Advertisement