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Ben Coxworth

Gizmag brings you our picks from NAHBS 2015 (Photo: Ben Coxworth/Gizmag.com)

Ever since its beginnings in 2005, the North American Handmade Bicycle Show has invited boutique bicycle builders from around the world to show off their finest, most innovative creations. Over the past few days, we've shared a number of the highlights from this year's show. Here's a quick look at some other awesome NAHBS bikes, that also caught our eye.  Read More

André Borschberg welcomes team mate Bertrand Piccard upon landing in Ahmedabad (Photo: Sol... The Solar Impulse 2 solar-powered airplane may have only just begun its attempt at a round-the-world flight, but it's already broken a world record. By traveling from Muscat, Oman to Ahmedabad, India, it broke the Solar Impulse team's previous record for longest solar-powered straight distance flight between predeclared waypoints.  Read More

The Noke U-Lock only unlocks if the user's smartphone is within Bluetooth range It's official – we are now living in the age of the keyless Bluetooth bike lock. We've already seen the Skylock, BitLock and Ulock. Now, there's also the Noke U-Lock.  Read More

The Monolith, with its Bluetooth remote hooked over the front

Although we're now seeing a wide variety of electric skateboards, most of them utilize the same setup – a motor mounted on the underside of the deck, that drives one or two of the wheels via a belt. The designers at California-based Inboard Sports, however, are setting out to change that. Their Monolith is claimed to be the world's first skateboard to feature hub motors in the two rear wheels.  Read More

A Futaka rep with the Samurai prototype at NAHBS 2015 (Photo: Ben Coxworth/Gizmag.com)

Titanium-framed bicycles and Samurai warriors are both things that a lot of people admire. So, what happens when you build an example of the former that's inspired by the latter? You get the striking Japanese-made Samurai road bike, which we spied at the North American Handmade Bicycle Show.  Read More

The Louisville Slugger Wood Bat Bike, on display at NAHBS 2015  (Photo: Ben Coxworth/Gizma...

This year's North American Handmade Bicycle Show was held in Louisville, Kentucky – a city known for its namesake Louisville Slugger baseball bat. Bicycle builder Chris Connor decided to commemorate the event, by building a one-off wooden bike made from Slugger baseball bat billets.  Read More

The bamboo/balsa composite-framed Bamboost by HERObike (Photo: Ben Coxworth/Gizmag)

Bicycles made from bamboo stalks are becoming increasingly common, but Greensboro, Alabama’s HERObike takes a different approach to using the material. At last year’s North American Handmade Bicycle Show, we saw some HERObike frames sporting carbon-fiber-reinforced tubes made from woven bamboo. At this year's show, the company was showing off its upcoming Bamboost e-bike, which features a composite frame that adds balsa wood and 3D-printed parts to the mix.  Read More

The Sarto 18K on display at NAHBS 2015 in Louisville, Kentucky (Photo: Ben Coxworth/Gizmag...

Because they’re made in small batches by hand, most of the bikes at the North American Handmade Bicycle Show are ... well, they ain’t cheap. One in particular, the Italian-made Sarto 18K, had a price tag of US$27,000 when you could still get one. What would you get for that price? Gold and crocodile skin, for starters.  Read More

Cykelmageren's Rasmus Gjesing with his hard-to-miss bike at NAHBS in Louisville (Photo: Be...

Every year, artisan bicycle builders from all over the world descend upon a different US city to show their wares at the North American Handmade Bicycle Show. This year, we traveled to Louisville, Kentucky, to take in the event. We decided to begin our coverage with a very eye-catching one-of-a-kind bike that was built especially for the show, by Copenhagen-based Cykelmageren.  Read More

Locking up the Yerka Last September we first heard about the one-off Yerka Project bike, which was designed by three engineering students in Chile. Its clever feature was a frame that partially came apart to act as a lock. That way, any thief tempted to break its lock would be ruining the very bike they wanted, too. Now, its creators are attempting to bring it to market via an Indiegogo campaign.  Read More

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