Advertisement

Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth
An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.
People running outdoors speed up and slow down without thinking about it – it just happens. On a treadmill, however, they have to manually adjust the speed of the machine. Perhaps they won't have to for too longer, however. Scientists at The Ohio State University have developed a prototype treadmill that detects when its user's running speed changes, and adjusts its own speed accordingly. Read More
Many people have likely watched aerial video shot by drones, and dreamed of getting such footage with a drone of their own. What they might not realize, however, is that controlling the little UAVs can be difficult, particularly if the user is trying to both fly the drone and keep a subject centered in the frame. That's why a group of entrepreneurs are creating the pre-programmable Ares quadcopter. Read More

Headlights, tail lights and even turn indicators certainly make cycling safer, but reaching around to operate all those devices at once could be a bit awkward. That's why Bontrager has announced its new Transmitr system. It allows multiple lights to be controlled from one handlebar-mounted remote, via the ANT+ wireless protocol. Read More

Two years ago we heard about the Nanostim, a pacemaker that's less than 10 percent the size of a regular model. While it's pretty darn small, Medtronic's just-announced Micra TPS (Transcatheter Pacing System) is reportedly even tinier. Billed as the world's smallest pacemaker, it's described as being the size of a large vitamin capsule – and it can be implanted using a catheter. Read More
While inclement weather and exertion are certainly factors, one of the big reasons that many people don't commute by bike is the fear of getting hit by cars. London-based Crispin Sinclair Innovation has set about addressing that fact, with its new Babel Bike. Offering features such as a protective cage around the rider, it's being promoted as "the world's safest bicycle." Read More
While countries such as Japan have sophisticated earthquake warning systems, the fact is that many less-developed countries do not. In order to offer those nations some form of protection, a consortium of US research institutes has devised the ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning System, in which regular peoples' smartphones could detect earthquakes and send warnings. Read More
Although there definitely are liquid-cooled PCs, there just isn't room for such cooling systems within smartphones – or at least, there hasn't been until now. Fujitsu recently announced development of a loop heat pipe that's less than one millimeter thick, which could help future mobile devices to keep their cool. Read More
While a lot of people would like a simple no-frills bicycle for basic transportation, they also don't want a poorly-made piece of junk. That's where the Dutch designers of the Reframed bike are hoping their product will fill a niche. It's a single-speed bike with a frame made separate pieces of extruded aluminum, that the user puts together themselves. Read More
In order to minimize the amount of human-produced greenhouse gases entering the atmosphere, numerous scientists have studied materials that could be used to capture excess carbon dioxide at one of its main sources – industrial smokestacks. Such substances have included metal-organic framework materials, ionic liquids, and even a sea urchin-inspired material. Unfortunately, however, not everything that's been suggested is inexpensive or easy to produce. That said, Norwegian researchers now believe that humble clay could do the job just fine. Read More
If there are two things that the Philippines has a lot of, it's motorized trikes and small flood-prone villages. That's why Filipino startup H2O Technologies has developed the Salamander. It's a three-wheeler that can be driven on the road like a normal vehicle most of the time, but that can also take to the water when floods occur. Read More
Advertisement