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Ben Coxworth

Watch out, Barack and Michelle - recent studies have concluded that viewing 3D content cau...

No, it's not just you. According to studies recently conducted by the University of California, Berkeley, the viewing of stereoscopic 3D displays does indeed cause visual discomfort, fatigue and headaches. The problem appears to come from the fact that the viewers' eyes are simultaneously trying to focus on the screen, and on objects that appear to be located either in front of or behind that screen.  Read More

Newly-developed software has been shown to pick out deceptive online reviews with almost 9...

One of the great things about the internet is the fact that everyday people can share what they know with the entire world, so if they’ve had a particularly good or bad experience with a business or product, they can notify everyone via customer review websites. The flip-side of that, however, is that business owners can plant fake reviews on those same sites, that either praise their own business or slam their competition. Well, confused consumers can now take heart – researchers from Cornell University have developed software that is able to identify phony reviews with close to 90 percent accuracy.  Read More

The 'Window to the World' project is developing interactive touchscreen windows, for use i...

As a child sitting in the back of the family car, did you ever use your finger to doodle in the condensation on the inside of the windows? Well, a group of engineers and designers from Toyota Motor Europe’s Kansei1 Design Division and the consultancy arm of the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design (CIID) have taken car-window-doodling into the 21st Century. They’ve created a prototype system that could turn the side windows of Toyotas into touchscreen augmented reality devices, allowing passengers to interface with the passing scenery.  Read More

The Gerber Steady multitool features a built-in miniature tripod

Since the advent of compact digital cameras, tiny tripods (or minipods, or whatever you want to call them) have become a pretty common sight. They’re often even included as part of a digital camera package, along with the ubiquitous lens-cleaning cloth. Given that they appear to be a popular tool, Gerber has done the obvious, and built one into its new Steady multitool.  Read More

The Brompton Dock is a 40-bay storage unit that dispenses folding bicycles to customers, w...

Sometimes it would be really handy to have a folding bicycle, that you could easily take with you on public transportation, then open up and ride to your final destination once you reached your stop. The question is, would you use it often enough to justify the purchase price? If not, then you’re just the type of person the Brompton Dock project was designed for. Users get a Brompton folding bike from a dispenser, use it for as long as they want, then return it and get billed for the time it was used.  Read More

The Power Up electric power module allows users to mount an electric propeller on their pa...

Although they’ve been around for ages, for some reason paper airplanes have never been adopted for commercial use. It could be because they get soggy when wet, they lack any kind of flight controls, or because you would need an incredibly huge piece of paper in order to make one big enough to carry a human passenger. In any case, practical paper airplanes have now perhaps come a baby step closer to reality, with Tailor Toys’ Power Up electric power module for paper airplanes – it allows you to mount an electric propeller on your paper airplanes, so they can fly under their own power.  Read More

Scientists at Caltech have created the world's first DNA-based artificial neural network

One of the things that our brains excel at is the ability to recognize what things are, even when presented with an incomplete set of data. If we know only that an animal is sold in pet stores and stuffs food in its cheeks, for instance, we can be pretty certain that the animal in question is a hamster. Now, for the first time ever, researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have created a DNA-based artificial neural network that can do the same thing ... albeit on a very basic level. They believe that it could have huge implications for the development of true artificial intelligence.  Read More

The flipphandle is a bicycle handlebar stem that lets riders turn their handlebars sideway...

If you’re fortunate enough to have an employer that lets you bring your bicycle inside, or if you keep your two-wheeled steed in an apartment, then you probably know just how in-the-way its handlebars can be in close quarters. Not only can they poke passers-by, but they also have a tendency to whack into door frames, and they prevent your bike from resting stably against walls. Loosening your handlebar stem and turning the bars parallel with the front wheel, while addressing the problem, is likely more work than most people are interested in doing on a daily basis. With the new flipphandle stem, however, riders can turn their bars sideways with just a press of a button.  Read More

Researchers are developing small, round swimming robots that could check pipes in nuclear ...

According to the Associated Press, a recent study has revealed that three quarters of America's nuclear reactors have leaked radioactive tritium from buried pipes that transport water for the cooling of reactor vessels. This tritium could in turn find its way into the groundwater. While industry officials do reportedly check these pipes for leaks, they can only do so in either indirect or costly, labor-intensive manners. Now, however, researchers from MIT are developing tiny, spherical swimming robots that could check on the pipes directly, relaying their findings in real time.  Read More

Russia's recently-launched RadioAstron spacecraft is intended to become part of the larges...

To look at the Russian RadioAstron spacecraft, which launched from Kazakhstan this Monday, it doesn’t seem particularly record-breaking. Its 10-meter (33-foot) antenna is certainly no match for those on earthbound radio telescopes, which can be up to 300 meters (984 feet) across. Once in orbit, however, its signal will join forces with those from ground-based telescopes to form one giant virtual telescope. Using a process known as interferometry, they will form the equivalent of a single radio telescope dish that at over 350,000 kilometers (217,480 miles) across is almost 30 times wider than the Earth. Although it’s not actually one physical object, it is nonetheless being heralded as the largest telescope ever created.  Read More

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