Advertisement

Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth

An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.

Follow Ben:

— Digital Cameras

ATC Chameleon actioncam gets two shots at once

When you’re shooting first-person video of activities such as surfing, cycling or kayaking, it always helps spice up the finished product if you include footage from more than one perspective. Usually, the only way that can be accomplished is to use multiple cameras, or to stop and reposition the one camera. Oregon Scientific, however, is taking a different approach with its new ATC Chameleon actioncam. It records two perspectives at once, which it merges into a split-screen display. Read More
— Bicycles

Smartphone-enabled automatic transmission developed for bicycles

In recent years, both Shimano and Campagnolo have introduced electronic gear-shifting systems for bicycles – instead of relying on steel cables, the systems wirelessly transmit signals from the user-operated shift levers to powered shifting actuators on the front and rear derailleurs. Now, a group of engineers from UK-based Cambridge Consultants are taking things a step further. They’ve developed a smartphone-based electronic automatic transmission for bikes. Read More

Recent discovery could save peoples' sight

There could be new hope for people facing vision loss due to conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa or wet age-related macular degeneration. Scientists from the University of Southampton have discovered that easily-gathered corneal cells may be able to take the place of degraded retinal cells, thus preventing or curing blindness. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Methamphetamine vaccine shows promise

Methamphetamine is one of the most addictive and thus commonly-used street drugs – according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, there are currently nearly 25 million meth addicts worldwide. Help may be on the way, however. Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have had success in using a methamphetamine vaccine to block the effects on meth on lab rats. Read More
— Automotive

Optical camouflage turns car's back seat transparent

When you turn around to look behind your car as you’re reversing, what do you see? If your car is like most, you see a bit of the road through the back window, with a whole lot of your back seat underneath. If only you could see through that seat, you could see so much more of the road. Well, a group from Japan’s Keio University has developed a system that lets drivers do that ... sort of. Read More
— Electronics

Ear-powered medical devices in development

Our ears work by converting the vibrations of the eardrum into electrochemical signals that can be interpreted by the brain. The current for those signals is supplied by an ion-filled chamber deep within the inner ear – it’s essentially a natural battery. Scientists are now looking at using that battery to power devices that could be implanted in the ear, without affecting the recipient’s hearing. Read More
— Urban Transport

Insect-inspired virtual traffic lights could replace – or augment – the real things

If you’ve ever seen two groups of ants meet up with one another on intersecting paths, you’ll notice that they don’t crash into each other. Instead, the larger group instinctively takes the right-of-way, followed by the smaller group – the same thing applies to bees and termites. Inspired by this behavior, Carnegie Mellon University telecommunications researcher Ozan Tonguz wondered if the same thing could be applied to traffic flow. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

GM tomatoes and helpful bacteria claimed to lower cholesterol

Atherosclerosis, more commonly known as hardening of the arteries, can have very serious consequences such as heart attacks and strokes. While there are medications that remove some of the offending plaque from the inside of the affected arteries, not everyone wants to take drugs unless absolutely necessary. Lifestyle improvements can certainly help, but soon two other options may be available – probiotics and genetically-engineered tomatoes. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement