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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth

An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.

Follow Ben:

— Science

GRIN optical technology could mean better implantable lenses

Although many people may think that the lenses in our eyes are just like those found in cameras, there is in fact one key difference between the two – while man-made lenses have just a single index of refraction, meaning that they only bend light in one direction, our natural lenses refract light by varying degrees. This is why artificial implanted lenses, such as those used to treat cataracts, can create visual distortions. A new technology, however, now allows for the fabrication of lenses that work just like the ones in our eyes. Read More
— Health & Wellbeing

Smart insole designed to correct gait problems

People who have received an artificial leg, had a hip replacement, or who are recovering from a broken leg all want to avoid one thing – developing a limp. Not only will it limit their mobility and increase the risk of falls, but it can also lead to problems such as osteoarthritis. That’s why University of Utah mechanical engineer Prof. Stacy Bamberg is developing the Rapid Rehab system – it’s a “smart” insole paired to a smartphone app, designed to provide users with feedback on how they walk. Read More
— Wearables

Casio device lets scuba divers converse underwater

Ordinarily, if scuba divers want to talk to one another underwater, they have to wear special full-face masks that leave their mouths unobstructed by the regulator. Such masks are pricey and a bit cumbersome, however, so they’re usually only used by professional divers. Today, however, Casio announced the development of a new type of underwater voice communications device that works with plain old “eyes-and-nose-only” dive masks. Read More

Handheld device scans and plays sheet music

Composers who want to know what their hand-written sheet music will sound like may soon have a new tool at their disposal. Using a hand-held device hooked up to their tablet or laptop, they could “play” that music in real time, wherever they were – even if a piano or other instrument was nowhere in sight. That’s the idea behind the Gocen, a prototype device being developed by a team from the Tokyo Metropolitan University. Read More
— Digital Cameras

ATC Chameleon actioncam gets two shots at once

When you’re shooting first-person video of activities such as surfing, cycling or kayaking, it always helps spice up the finished product if you include footage from more than one perspective. Usually, the only way that can be accomplished is to use multiple cameras, or to stop and reposition the one camera. Oregon Scientific, however, is taking a different approach with its new ATC Chameleon actioncam. It records two perspectives at once, which it merges into a split-screen display. Read More
— Bicycles

Smartphone-enabled automatic transmission developed for bicycles

In recent years, both Shimano and Campagnolo have introduced electronic gear-shifting systems for bicycles – instead of relying on steel cables, the systems wirelessly transmit signals from the user-operated shift levers to powered shifting actuators on the front and rear derailleurs. Now, a group of engineers from UK-based Cambridge Consultants are taking things a step further. They’ve developed a smartphone-based electronic automatic transmission for bikes. Read More

Recent discovery could save peoples' sight

There could be new hope for people facing vision loss due to conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa or wet age-related macular degeneration. Scientists from the University of Southampton have discovered that easily-gathered corneal cells may be able to take the place of degraded retinal cells, thus preventing or curing blindness. Read More
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