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Ben Coxworth

Around The Home

Wayki combines two of your favorite things – a toothbrush and an alarm clock

Whether it’s smartphones, cameras or MP3 players, it probably goes without saying that most consumer electronics are designed for maximum user convenience ... that doesn’t always end up being the case, but it is at least the intention. The Wayki is somewhat unique, however, in that it’s specifically designed to force the user into doing two things that they’d rather put off: getting out of bed, and brushing their teeth. That’s right, it’s a combination alarm clock and toothbrush. Read More

Medical

Microneedles used to deliver live dried vaccines through the skin

While it’s vitally important to bring vaccines for diseases such as tuberculosis to developing nations, getting them there is only part of the challenge. Because these countries often have unreliable infrastructures, it’s entirely possible that the vaccines can’t consistently be kept as cold as is required. As a result, they could be rendered ineffective. Now, however, scientists from King’s College London have succeeded in containing a dried live vaccine in a microneedle array, that doesn’t need to be refrigerated. Read More

Medical

Plastic used to replace and regrow bone

Over the past several years, a number of research institutes have been exploring the use of implants made from material with a scaffolding-like structure, as a means of regrowing bone at severe injury sites. Both MIT and Tufts University, for instance, have been working on collagen-based materials. Now, England’s University of Southampton has announced the development of a new type of bone-growing substance, made from plastic. Read More

Customized sledges could mean faster paralympic skiers

Cross-country and biathlon skiers competing in the 2014 Winter Paralympics may have an advantage over skiers who have competed in previous games. This time around, some of them might be using custom-optimized ski sledges, made by a consortium including Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials. Read More

Good Thinking

DropTag will let you know when and if your parcel has been dropped

If you’re like most people, you probably just sign for a delivered parcel upon receiving it at your front door. You really ought to open it and check that its contents are intact first, but who wants to bother doing that? Well, if the DropTag makes its way into production, a quick check on your smartphone will be all that’s needed to tell you if your goods have arrived unharmed. Read More

Digital Cameras

Lynx A camera generates 3D models in real time

It may look like a rather beefy tablet, but the Lynx A is actually a device that could make life easier for graphic artists, animators, architects, 3D printing enthusiasts, and potentially quite a few other people. Putting it simply, it’s a point-and-shoot camera that creates digital 3D models of whatever it’s pointed at.Read More

No laundry job is too small for the Swoosh

Perhaps you’re a single apartment-dweller who doesn’t have a lot of clothes to wash, or room for a full-sized washing machine. That said, you still don’t like having to trek back and forth to the shared laundry room every time you need clean socks or undies. If so, King Jim’s new Swoosh countertop washer might be what you need. Read More

Urban Transport

MOVEO electric scooter folds in two, and looks kind of cool

When you hear the term “folding electric scooter,” you likely think of a stand-up scooter along the lines of the Zümaround or the MyWay Compact. At best, you might picture something with a bicycle-style saddle and seatpost, such as the Voltitude. MOVEO, however, features a full traditional seat that’s mounted directly on the chassis. Although the scooter isn’t in production yet, it hopefully will be by next year. Read More

Robotics

Moth takes the driver's seat in smell-tracking robot

In the future, we may have autonomous robots that follow scents to track down gas leaks, rescue disaster victims trapped in debris, or perform other duties. While the algorithms that drive such robots could perhaps just be made up from scratch, scientists from the University of Tokyo are instead looking to the insect world for inspiration. To that end, they recently created a two-wheeled robot that was successfully driven by female-seeking male silkmoths. Read More

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