Highlights from Interbike 2014

Ben Coxworth

Hangin' out on the Flying Rider prototype

When architect and engineer David Schwartz was watching an uphill section of the 2011 Tour de France, he noticed that the riders' bodies were bobbing up and down as they pedaled. If only their backs had something to push against, he figured, that vertical motion could be converted into increased leverage on the pedals. The result is his proof-of-concept Flying Rider prototype bike.  Read More

The bionic pancreas' two pumps, sensor, and app-packing iPhone 4s

This February, we first heard about a "bionic pancreas" that could radically improve the lives of type 1 diabetics. At the time, multi-day trials involving groups of adult and adolescent patients were still yet to occur. Those trials have now taken place, and the results are definitely encouraging.  Read More

The HEXO+ drone autonomously tracks its user

If you watch almost any video promoting a consumer drone, chances are you'll see the aircraft flying along above a moving motorbike rider, snowboarder or other fast-moving athlete. It makes for some impressive aerial footage of the person, but also requires a fair bit of piloting skill. Additionally, if you buy one of those drones, you'll end up shooting other people doing those things – what if you want footage of yourself? Well, that's where the HEXO+ hexacopter comes in. It autonomously flies above its user, shooting video of them as they do their thing.  Read More

The MindRider helmet works with an app to help bicycle commuters lessen their stress

While many people will tell you that commuting by bicycle is less stressful than driving, the fact remains that it can still be ... well, stressful. While you could try to determine the least-taxing route by jotting down how tense you are in which places, doing so could get pretty complicated. The MindRider, however, is designed to make that process easier. It's a "mind-reading" bike helmet that lets you create so-called mind maps of your travels.  Read More

The actual path traveled by a football (yellow), and its path as determined by the magneti...

Have you ever wondered how game officials know if the football has passed the goal line, in situations where it's hidden under a pile-up of players? Well, sometimes they don't know, and they just have to hope that it isn't moved as the players get up. A team of researchers from North Carolina State University, Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research, however, may have a solution. They're developing a method of tracking a football via low-frequency magnetic fields.  Read More

The IzzyBike definitely has a look of its own

Bike chains can be dirty and noisy, so an increasing number of manufacturers are choosing to replace them with belt drives. Polish inventor Marek Jurek, however, has gone a step further with his IzzyBike prototype. Its drivetrain is built right into the front wheel hub, which gives it some claimed advantages over other bikes – besides there being less mess.  Read More

The INKAS Huron APC

The National Police of Colombia are about to receive the first four production units of a new armored personnel carrier that may look like an angry Hummer limo, but is in fact built around a Kenworth chassis and drive train. Made by Toronto-based INKAS Armored Vehicle Manufacturing, the Huron APC incorporates "revolutionary lightweight armor" which is claimed to give it more speed and maneuverability than other similarly-sized armored vehicles.  Read More

The Moto Knee is a prosthetic leg designed for a variety of high-impact sports

You probably wouldn't try using the same motorbike for both racing over rough trails and commuting on smooth roads, so ... why use the same prosthetic leg? That's the thinking behind the Moto Knee, a prosthesis that's designed for activities such as skiing, horseback riding, cycling and motocross. In order to withstand the impacts that come with such activities, it even incorporates a Fox DHX Air mountain bike shock absorber.  Read More

Inside a test dome built using the pneumatic wedge method

There probably aren't many domed concrete structures where you live, and there's a reason for that – they're difficult to build. Doing so usually requires the construction of a supporting wooden structure, that holds the concrete in place while it hardens. Now, however, a team at the Vienna University of Technology has devised a system that allows concrete shell structures to simply be "inflated" and cinched together with a steel cable.  Read More

Nova provides more lighting options than the iPhone's built-in flash Last September, we first heard about Nova – a wireless external flash designed for use with the iPhone. At the time, its creators were raising production funds on Kickstarter. As of today, however, it's available for purchase.  Read More

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