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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth

An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.

Follow Ben:

— Urban Transport

Fast-charging EDDA electric bus shows promise for regular use

By - June 3, 2015 2 Pictures

If electric buses are ever going to become a common sight in cities around the world, then they'll need to be able to operate like their traditional counterparts. This means no taking long breaks to recharge, or sacrificing seating space for the storage of huge batteries. While allowing them to draw power from the road is one alternative, the European EDDA Bus consortium is working on another – electric buses that can grab a quick charge at bus stops in just a few minutes.

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— Science

Scientists come a step closer to "regrowing" limbs

By - June 3, 2015 2 Pictures

Currently, recipients of arm or leg transplants need to take immunosuppressive drugs for the rest of their lives, in order to keep the donated parts from being rejected. If we could grow our own replacement limbs, however, that wouldn't be necessary. And while we do already possess the progenitor cells needed to grow such parts, what's been lacking is a method of assembling them into the form of the desired limb. Now, however, scientists have created a shortcut of sorts – they've stripped the cells from one rat's forelimb and replaced them with live cells from another rat, creating a functioning limb that the second rat's immune system won't reject.

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— Health and Wellbeing

Software objectively assesses children's pain levels

By - June 2, 2015

It's important to know how much pain young hospital patients are experiencing, and not just because no one wants them to suffer – additionally, excessive pain can indicate problems that need addressing. That's why scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have developed facial pattern recognition software that objectively assesses children's pain levels based on consistent indicators.

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X-raying meat could guarantee its tenderness

Although many retailers already display the tenderness of meat cuts on their packaging, Norwegian research group SINTEF has developed what it believes is a better system. Instead of relying on human interpretations of tenderness, it uses x-rays to give a less subjective and more accurate rating.

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— Wearable Electronics

Here Active Listening earbuds: Audio adjustment for the real world

By - June 2, 2015 2 Pictures

We've already heard about electronic earplugs that only block sound when loud noises occur, or that amplify human voices. Doppler Labs' Here Active Listening system, however, takes things a step further. Consisting of an app-controlled pair of wireless earbuds, it lets users filter out or enhance audio frequencies in real-world ambient sound before it reaches their ears.

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— Good Thinking

Apps help deaf cinema-goers hear movies

By - June 1, 2015

For people with limited hearing, understanding movies or plays can be challenging – particularly if they don't own a hearing aid. That's why engineers at Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technolgy have developed a system that streams audio from the stage or screen to the user's earphone-equipped smartphone.

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— Bicycles

Ding bike light uses two beams to shine down and out

By - May 29, 2015 5 Pictures

When cycling at night, it's important not just to be seen from the front and back but also from the sides. In order to make that happen, bicycle lighting systems typically either add dedicated side lights or they divert part of the main headlight beam. The Ding headlight, however, puts out one beam that shines forward, along with a second one that lights up the road directly to either side of the bike.

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