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Ben Coxworth

Bacterial biofilm formation on the right side of medical tubing is visible after being sta...

Whenever foreign objects such as catheters, implants or other devices are placed within the human body, there's a danger that bacterial colonies known as biofilms could collect on them, leading to infections. Now, however, scientists at Harvard University's Wyss Institute have created a material that's too slippery for those biofilms to cling onto. It works by continuously releasing oil.  Read More

Activating Phorm causes physical buttons to appear over the characters on an iPad mini's v...

Three years ago, California-based startup Tactus Technology unveiled a pretty nifty prototype – it was a touchscreen which featured clear round buttons that could rise up over top of the characters on a mobile device's virtual keyboard, giving users the tactile sensation of using a physical keyboard. When not needed, however, those buttons flattened down and the screen became entirely smooth again. Now, that prototype has become a product known as Phorm, designed for use with all versions of the iPad mini.  Read More

Is that really grouper? The QuadPyre RT-NASBA can tell you (Photo: Shutterstock)

According to a study conducted by international non-profit group Oceana, approximately 30 percent of seafood sold in the US is fraudulently mislabeled. That's why scientists at the University of South Florida have created a handheld sensor that can determine if what's being offered is in fact the real thing.  Read More

Research indicates that using a smartphone app to track your activity is no less accurate ...

Although most wearable fitness-tracking devices do offer a wealth of features, the fact is that many of those features are based on the number of steps that the user has walked or run. According to a new study, inexpensive smartphone apps are just as good if not better at measuring that sort of data.  Read More

A Robochop robot, hard at work (Photo: Matthias Ziegler)

How would you like to get an industrial robot to build something that you designed, which you then get to keep? Well, you'll have your chance next month. That's when Germany's GFT Group will be presenting Robochop, an installation of four foam-carving robots that can be controlled by regular people via the internet.  Read More

Tracky's top and pants incorporate 11 accelerometers, along with other sensors

When professional athletes are having their performance analyzed, it's certainly not unheard of for them to wear motion capture suits while training in a lab environment. Coaches and others can then analyze their movements, to see where improvements could be made. Indian startup ProjectPOLE is now offering that same feedback to everyday athletes, with its Tracky motion-tracking sportswear.  Read More

FlipCrown lets you do this with your handlebars If you've ever gotten snagged against a bicycle parked in a cramped space, chances are it was the handlebars that got you. FlipCrown is designed to keep that from happening, by allowing cyclists to flip their bars sideways when they park their bike.  Read More

Two Snolo Scions, ready to hit the slopes

Back in 2012, we first heard about the Stealth-X carbon fiber sled. Designed by New Zealand-based company Snolo, it was designed to be fast, light and maneuverable. Unfortunately for most of us, it also cost US$2,999. Now, however, Snolo is ready to begin production on a much more affordable plastic version of the sled, known as the Scion.  Read More

The fishing boat, with its four chambers visible at the front

An old fishing trawler has been given new life in Norway, where it's now anchored offshore in the Stadthavet area and serving as a wave power plant. It's part of a project which ultimately calls for larger, purpose-built vessels to convert wave motion into electricity.  Read More

VRide Multi displays the identity, speed and location of other online users, layered over ...

If you don't like cycling alone on a trainer all winter, you might be interested in Zwift or ebove. Both of these systems let indoor cyclists "virtually" ride on animated roads or trails, along with other cyclists who join them via the internet and appear as avatars. Perhaps, however, that computer-generated scenery just isn't cutting it for you. In that case, VeloReality’s VRide Multi may be more to your liking. It's similar to those other multi-player systems, but it uses actual HD first-person video shot on various scenic roads around the world.  Read More

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