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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth

An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.

Follow Ben:

— Bicycles

SussMyBike shows riders how to set their suspension

For many people who own a mountain bike with a suspension fork, the settings on that fork are either left as they were in the store, or just set to the manufacturer's suggested parameters. Setting them more specifically does make for a better riding experience, but not everyone knows to do so. That's why Scottish cyclist Alan Mason teamed up with partners at the Mountain Bike Centre of Scotland, Napier University and Edinburgh University to create SussMyBike. It analyzes your fork's performance, then tells you how it should be set up to better meet your needs.

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— Music

"Zoolophone" features custom-shaped keys that still produce the right notes

Scientists from Columbia, Harvard and MIT have collaborated to create a xylophone-like instrument that has keys shaped like animals. It's not just a cute toy, however. Their "zoolophone" was designed using new technology that allows objects of a specified shape to produce a specified sound. It could ultimately be used to build things like low-noise computer fans, or bridges that don't amplify road noise.

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— Environment

Claimed darkening of ice sheet could actually be down to aging satellite sensors

In recent years, satellite photos of Greenland's ice sheet have shown what appears to be a darkening of the ice's surface. A number of scientists have suggested that this could be due to settled soot particles from fossil fuel production and/or forest fires, and that their presence could result in accelerated melting of the ice. Now, however, researchers from Dartmouth College believe that the ice may still still be relatively clean, and that its darkness in the photos could just be due to faulty sensors on the satellites.

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— Automotive

Nissan's Piloted Drive prototype to begin on-road tests

Three years ago, Nissan unveiled a one-of-a-kind Leaf electric car that incorporated autonomous driving features such as Automated Valet Parking, in which it would drop off its driver before finding parking on its own. In 2013, using the company's Autonomous Drive system, the car drove on a Tokyo highway without human assistance. This Thursday an updated test vehicle was unveiled, which features the automaker's new Piloted Drive system. Plans call for it to soon be tested on busy urban roads.

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— 3D Printing

Scientists use 3D printer to create synthetic hair

You know how when you're using a hot glue gun, and you get all those little strands of glue forming when you pull the gun back from the surface being glued? Well, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used that same principle to create 3D-printed "hair." The discovery could allow for the creation of 3D-printed devices containing brushes or bristles … or even for making troll dolls.

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— Bicycles

Wire Brake replaces conventional bike brake levers

Fixie bikes are all about simplicity. Besides just having one fixed gear with no associated derailleurs, shifters or freehubs, many of them don't even have brakes – instead, riders just stop them by stopping pedalling. Italian manufacturer OML, however, has introduced a braking system that may meet the minimalist standards of fixie riders. It's called Wire Brake, and it replaces two brake levels with a single plastic-housed wire.

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— Bicycles

AIM mountain bike stem can be set to three riding positions

Mountain bikes' handlebar stems are a bit of a compromise. They put the bars at a length and angle that are generally good for most types of riding, but that aren't necessarily ideal for any one. While adjustable-angle stems do exist, most still don't let you change the length. Well, that's why Spain's 3FStech created the AIM stem. With the push of a button, it lets riders switch between three bar angles and reach lengths.

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