2015 Detroit NAIAS Auto Show

Ben Coxworth

The BSXinsight measures lactate levels in the user's calf muscle

Whether they're training or taking part in actual competitions, athletes have to maintain a delicate balance – they want to make sure that they're "giving it everything they've got," yet they don't want to push themselves to the point that they cramp up or drop from exhaustion. That's why the BSXinsight was created. Billed as being the world's first wearable lactate threshold sensor, it's made to let athletes know how close they're getting to the edge, so they can approach it but not go over.  Read More

Using a smartphone, users could scan QR codes to see encrypted 3D images (Photo: Shutterst...

Whether they're on product packaging, promotional materials or in magazines, most QR codes do the same thing – when a smartphone scans them with its camera, they trigger that phone's web browser to navigate to a given website. In the near future, however, they may be used to securely display 3D images on the user's phone, without even involving the often-untrustworthy internet.  Read More

The E.T definitely has a look of its own We're certainly seeing a lot of folding electric scooters lately, including models that can be carried in a backpack, go off-road, and feature rear-wheel steering. One of the latest, the E.T Scooter, certainly has a unique look – and it can reportedly fold in just five seconds.  Read More

An x-ray displaying BoneFinder-enhanced hip bones Despite what cartoons may have us believe, x-rays don't always show bones as being sharply defined from the surrounding tissue. It's often difficult to tell where the one ends and the other begins, requiring clinicians to go through the images and manually draw in the outlines of bones. Now, however, free software known as BoneFinder is able to do so automatically.  Read More

The line array being tested at the University of Southampton's Institute of Sound and Vibr... It's a classic situation ... a family is watching TV, but in order for the grandparents to be able to hear it, the volume is turned up too loud for everyone else's liking. A PhD student from the University of Southampton, however, might have a solution. Marcos Simón has developed a speaker system that projects high-volume audio to just one spot in the room.  Read More

The DJI Inspire 1, with its landing gear and prop arms raised for flight

Although DJI Innovations is best-known for its line of "prosumer" Phantom quadcopters, it also makes a professional-use multicopter called the Spreading Wings. Among other things, that model features landing gear that folds up while the aircraft is in flight, so it won't get in the shot of the user's undercarriage-mounted video camera. Now, DJI has announced its new Inspire 1 quadcopter, which combines aspects of both the Phantom and the Spreading Wings.  Read More

Pyle's PVTTBT8 turntable, open for business While many people consider record players to be "delightfully retro," those same folks might not have much use for something that plays nothing but vinyl. Pyle Audio has set out to address that, with its decidedly un-retro-named PVTTBT8 turntable. It looks like something you'd bring to a 1950s sock-hop, but it plays both records and digital music files.  Read More

A flower petal treated with WetForce-enabled sunscreen, before and after exposure to water...

Most people generally think of water and sweat as being things that hinder the effectiveness of sunscreen – even in cases where it's billed as being waterproof. According to Shiseido, however, its newly-developed WetForce technology not only keeps water from compromising sunscreen, but actually uses it to help block UV rays.  Read More

The prototype implant, with its near-infrared LED

Wouldn't it be great if there were implants that detected the brainwaves associated with conditions such as chronic headaches or epilepsy, and then responded by triggering genes in the patient's body to produce a protein that treated the condition? Well, scientists at the ETH Zurich research institute are on their way to making it happen. They've developed an implant that causes genetically-modified cells to express a specific protein, and the device is indeed activated by brain waves.  Read More

A top view of the nanopores, each of which is a separate battery in its own right

As electronic devices continue to get smaller, one question becomes increasingly pertinent – how will we power them? Well, smaller batteries would seem to be the most obvious answer. With that in mind, researchers at the University of Maryland have succeeded in creating a tiny battery that incorporates even smaller structures, known as nanopores.  Read More

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