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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth
An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.
While there certainly are drivers who knowingly exceed the speed limit, many others aren't even aware that they're doing so. Given that using cruise control isn't all that practical when driving around town, Ford has instead introduced the Intelligent Speed Limiter. The technology will debut on the newest incarnation of the automaker's S-Max vehicle. Read More
In its recent Ah A May exercise, Yamaha both spelled its own name backwards, and got two groups of its designers to trade places – musical instrument designers from Yamaha Corp were tasked with creating motorcycles, while motorcycle designers from Yamaha Motor Company had to create instruments. We've already seen the interesting musical devices that resulted, but now here's the pair of two-wheelers. Read More
Whether they're on robots or amputees, artificial hands tend to be rather complex mechanisms, incorporating numerous motor-driven cables. Engineers from Germany's Saarland University, however, have taken a different approach with their hand. It moves its fingers via shape-memory nickel-titanium alloy wires, bundled together to perform intricate tasks by working like natural muscle fibers. Read More
Mining operations tend not be very good for the environment, nor does the disposal of treated solid waste that still contains potentially-toxic metals. Now, however, scientists are looking into taking that waste and harvesting its trace amounts of metals such as gold, silver and platinum. Doing so could ultimately reduce the need for mining and decrease the amount of metals entering the environment, while also turning sewage into a source of revenue. Read More
When a new lab was recently being set up at Purdue University in Indiana, a lot of the equipment arrived in boxes full of protective packing "peanuts." Unfortunately, few facilities exist for recycling the little pieces of foam, so they typically end up sitting in (or getting blown around) landfills for several decades. A team of Purdue researchers, however, discovered that they could find use in better-performing lithium-ion batteries. Read More
It was three years ago that we first heard about Rethink Robotics' Baxter industrial robot. Priced at US$22,000 and requiring no programming expertise on the part of its users, it was intended to bring robotic automation to manufacturers who would otherwise not be able to afford it. Now, Rethink has announced the more compact and agile Sawyer robot. Read More
The first time we ever heard about a padlock that can be unlocked by Bluetooth instead of a key or combination, it was the Noke by FŪZ Designs. While it won't be shipping until this June, however, SafeTech Products' similar Quicklock will begin doing so next week – reportedly becoming the world's first Bluetooth padlock to actually reach consumers. We recently had the chance to try out an engineering sample unit. Read More
It may seem hard to believe, but Campagna Motors' three-wheeled high-performance T-REX has been around for 20 years now. To mark the occasion, the Montreal-based company is producing a special 20th Anniversary edition of the vehicle. If you want one, though, you'd better act fast – only 20 are being made. Read More

Tubeless tires have become pretty much standard on higher-end mountain bikes, thanks partly to the fact that they're able to self-seal small punctures. When it comes to larger holes, however, they need a little help. That's why award-winning South African competitive cyclist Stefan Sahm created the Sahmurai Sword. Read More

When it comes to mechanical watches, we're used to seeing ones with the traditional face and hands. Romain Jerome's new Subcraft, however, does things a little differently. It displays the hour laterally in photoluminescent digital-style numerals along one edge, while the minute is viewed on a disc on top. Read More
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