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Ben Coxworth

Diabetic foot ulcers may soon be treated with a new drug delivered via a transdermal patch...

When someone has diabetes, foot injuries such as ulcers can take a long time to heal. Not only does this cause diabetics prolonged discomfort, but it can even lead to amputation. Help may be on the way, however, in the form of a drug that's delivered through a skin patch.  Read More

The Breaker, with its bits and pouch Last year we heard about the Nutter, a stainless steel device that combines a multi-bit cycling multitool with a tire lever. Since then, inventor Mark Windsor decided to take that design and make it even more useful. The result is the Breaker, which is essentially a Nutter with an added chain-break tool.  Read More

A ship's bridge, with the Marine Armor System deployed

There are a number of systems out there designed to keep pirates from boarding ships, incorporating everything from lasers to acoustic devices to writhing water hoses. However, what happens if the pirates get on board anyway? If the ship is equipped with the Marine Armor System, a series of ballistic blinds will roll down throughout the vessel, blocking access to its interior.  Read More

Cree's new LED bulbs will be less expensive than the current models, thanks to a heat sink...

Cree has already gone a long way towards making incandescent light bulbs obsolete, by introducing its relatively normal-looking, inexpensive LED bulbs. Today, however, the company announced that those bulbs will soon be ... well, even more normal-looking and inexpensive, thanks to the elimination of the heat sink.  Read More

An existing overdose-treatment drug is now being tested in nasal spray form (Photo: Shutte...

Heroin overdoses are typically treated using injections of a medication that resuscitates the victim. That's fine if paramedics are doing it, but not everyone feels comfortable giving someone else a needle. That's why scientists at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) are developing a nasal spray that does the job.  Read More

A conventional fire shelter after exposure to the heat of a forest fire (left) as compared...

Last June, a wildfire near Yarnell, Arizona overtook and killed 19 firefighters – even though they had set up fireproof shelters. This inspired Phoenix-based SunSeeker Enterprises to develop a shelter that's better able to withstand the high heat of forest fires. Utilizing a material licensed from NASA to protect the Space Shuttle on re-entry, the Fire Blanket is the result.  Read More

RMIT's sensor-equipped MAV in a wind tunnel experiment

Turbulence can be unpleasant enough for passengers in full-sized aircraft, but it's even more of a challenge for unmanned micro air vehicles (MAVs) – a good gust can blow one of the little drones completely off course, or even cause it to crash. That's why a team from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, has looked to birds for a solution. The result is a system that detects turbulence before it buffets the MAV, allowing the aircraft to anticipate it and thus maintain a smoother flight. The technology could also be applicable to regular airplanes.  Read More

The Dexmo Classic (left) and F2

What happens when you're immersed in a virtual world – such as a game – and you want to use your real-world fingers to control your virtual fingers in that world? Well, we've already seen a number of sensor-equipped gloves, but China's Dexta Robotics is taking what it claims is a more cost-effective approach. Its Dexmo is an exoskeleton for your hand, which can even provide the user with a limited sense of touch.  Read More

The LittleBig Bike, in its larger-frame-but-still-no-pedals configuration

It's one of those "givens" of raising a child – as they get older, you have to get them bigger and more advanced bicycles. That can get a bit costly, so Irish entrepreneur Simon Evans designed an alternative. His LittleBig Bike can be converted from a small balance bike to a larger one, and then to a pedal bike.  Read More

Prof. Jason Heikenfeld with the prototype patch (left) and the upcoming Bluetooth version ...

Nobody likes having blood samples drawn. What's more, such samples typically have to be analyzed in a lab before they're able to tell us anything. Now, however, scientists at the University of Cincinnati and the US Air Force Research Laboratory are developing a system in which a Band-Aid-like skin patch is able to gather and transmit medical data in almost real time, by analyzing the patient's sweat ... and you just need a smartphone to read it, no poking or prodding required.  Read More

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