2015 Detroit NAIAS Auto Show

Ben Coxworth

It may look like it's made for cycling without sitting down, but the Bionic Runner is desi...

Running may be a great source of exercise, but it isn't exactly a low-impact workout – in fact, many runners are injured by the repeating jarring of their feet against the ground. That's why Australian startup Run4 developed the Bionic Runner. It looks like a seatless bicycle and is designed to replicate the motion of running, but without the "hard landing" at the bottom of every stride.  Read More

One of the existing Tulip pilot plants

For five years now, a Tulip concentrating solar power plant has been operating at a kibbutz in Israel. In January 2012, a second one sprouted in Spain. While both plants have been successfully pumping out electricity ever since, they were also both built as research and development exercises. Soon, however, the world's first commercial Tulip plant will be built for a paying client, in Ethiopia.  Read More

A wind turbine blade is covered in ice, except for where a Windheat film is located (Photo...

Given that the sterotypical image of the world's northern regions involves howling winds, why don't we see more wind turbines in such places? Well, it's largely because those turbines' blades would ice up a lot. The added weight could cause them to turn more slowly, to break down by throwing off their balance, and it could cause their operators to shut them down during potentially icy weather. The European Union Windheat Project is aiming to change that, with a carbon nanotube-based de-icing system.  Read More

The ecoDemonstrator 787 lifts off yesterday at Boeing Field in Seattle (Photo: Boeing)

Almost a year ago, Boeing announced that it was looking into running airliners on a mixture of jet fuel and "green diesel" – the latter of which is made from vegetable oils, waste cooking oil and waste animal fats. Yesterday in Seattle the corporation followed through on that plan, flying its ecoDemonstrator 787 flight test airplane on the fuel blend.  Read More

One Street Components' Bike Shift Lever is made from scrap aluminum, along with a bottle c...

For millions of people, bicycles are more than just a source of recreation – they're a depended-upon means of transportation. Unfortunately for many of those people, however, they can't afford to buy decent parts when their old ones wear out. That's why Arizona-based bicycle advocacy nonprofit One Street Components has announced a new project, which will allow partnering groups to make shift levers from readily-available materials including scrap aluminum and bottle caps.  Read More

An Eyeteq-enhanced digital image There may soon be help for red-green colorblind TV viewers. University of East Anglia spinoff company Spectral Edge has announced its Eyeteq system, which reportedly "allows color-blind viewers to better differentiate between red and green when watching programs, allowing them to see details they previously could not."  Read More

A diagram illustrating the makeup of the implants

Imagine if there were a remote-control electronic device that could be implanted at an infection site, where it would treat the infection by heating or medicating the affected tissue. While it might be very effective, subsequent infections could result if surgeons went in to remove it, or even if they just left it in place. That's why scientists from Tufts University and the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana have developed infection-treating implants that simply dissolve into the body once they've served their purpose.  Read More

Inventas' Fredrik Lund (left) and SINTEF's Gorm Johansen with the new robot (Photo: Invent...

When it comes to robots that perform internal inspections of water pipes, virtually all of them move along on rubber tires or treads. As that rubber grips against the inside of the pipe, however, it dislodges rust particles that ultimately end up coming out of peoples' taps. In an effort to address that problem, the European Union TRACT project is developing a propeller-driven inspection robot that keeps the pipe-touching to a minimum.  Read More

Russell Randall pedals a Seahorse on Florida's Rainbow River

Back in the early 90s, MIT's Prof. Mark Drela created a motor-less hydrofoil known as the Decavitator. Using nothing but his own leg power to turn the craft's 10-foot (3-m) air propeller, he got it up to a speed of 18.5 knots (21 mph/34 km/h), breaking the human-powered water speed record in the process. Inspired by the Decavitator, aerospace inventor Russell Randall created his own pedal-propelled airboat called the Seahorse – and you can now buy one of your own.  Read More

A rendering of a 3.7 micron-wide 'microbullet' hitting a sheet of graphene, which deforms ...

While graphene is already known for being the world's strongest material, most studies have focused on its tensile strength – that's the maximum stress that it can withstand while being pulled or stretched, before failing. According to studies conducted at Houston's Rice University, however, its ability to absorb sudden impacts hadn't previously been thoroughly explored. As it turns out, the material is 10 times better than steel at dissipating kinetic energy. That could make it an excellent choice for lightweight ballistic body armor.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 30,409 articles
Editor's Choice
Product Comparisons