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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth

An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.

Follow Ben:

— Medical

EyeGuide Focus is claimed to detect concussions in 10 seconds

Although concussions can have very serious consequences, they're also difficult to diagnose without the proper equipment. As a result, we've seen a variety of technologies aimed at helping athletic coaches to determine if players who have received knocks to the head are indeed concussed. One of the latest such systems, EyeGuide's Focus, promises to deliver results in just 10 seconds.

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— Sports

Levitation brace gives users spring-loaded knees

Whether they're playing sports or suffering from joint injuries, some people could definitely benefit from using a wearable assistive device. Exoskeletons are certainly one option, although if it's just the knee that needs a boost, then a whole rig isn't really necessary. That's where Levitation comes in. It's a spring-loaded knee brace that augments the user's quadriceps, helping to move their lower leg back forward after every step.

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— Robotics

Japanese exoskeleton could help users walk and run, no batteries required

Assistive exoskeletons are a bit like electric bikes – they do indeed give users a power boost, but part of that boost is needed just to move the extra weight along. Japanese researchers at Hiroshima University and Daiya Industry Co., however, have created a minimalist exoskeleton that does away with heavy batteries and motors. Instead, their Unplugged Powered Suit (UPS) harnesses the wearer's own weight.

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— Environment

High-tech camera allows us to see invisible methane gas

Although methane is one of the most potent of the greenhouses gases, scientists still aren't entirely clear on all of its ground-based sources. That's why researchers from Sweden's Linköping and Stockholm universities have created a camera that's capable of imaging methane in real time. They say that it could find use in monitoring sources such as sludge deposits, combustion processes, farms and lakes.

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— Science

New process allows inkjet printers to produce rainbow holograms

Credit card and banknote-style security holograms are an effective form of anti-counterfeiting technology, as they're very difficult to replicate. Every time a new batch is made, however, a "master hologram" has to be created first, to act as a template. These masters can take days to produce, using complex, expensive equipment. That could be about to change, however, as scientists at Russia's ITMO University have developed a quick-and-easy hologram production method that utilizes a regular inkjet printer.

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— Wearable Electronics

KickSoul lets users control devices using their feet

As the engineers who developed Ford's kick-activated tailgate realized a few years ago, people tend to use their feet to perform tasks when their hands are full. Now, a team of researchers at the MIT Media Lab team has applied the same sort of thinking to the control of electronic devices. Their prototype KickSoul system lets users wirelessly control smartphones, computers and appliances using foot movements.

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— Around The Home

Bowley Lock promises high security at a low price

If the movies and TV are to be believed, picking a conventional lock is as easy as sticking a tool into a keyhole, thoughtfully moving it around for a few seconds, then pulling the door open with a crafty smile. While there are special high-security locks that are much harder to pick, they also tend to be quite expensive. That's why Canadian inventor Ryan Bowley created the Bowley Lock – it's claimed to be virtually pick-proof, yet affordable to the average home-owner.

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