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Ben Coxworth

Ben Coxworth

An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.

Follow Ben:

— Medical

Enzyme could make any type of donated blood safe for anyone to receive

By - May 1, 2015 1 Picture
When it comes to donated blood, type O is special. It can be given to anyone, regardless of their blood type. By contrast, type A can only go to A or AB patients, and B can only go to B or AB patients. Additionally, type O patients can only receive O. Thanks to new research, however, it may soon be possible to give anyone whatever type of blood happens to be available, with no ill effects. Read More
— Bicycles

The Limits cycling power meter may be the simplest, cheapest one yet

By - May 1, 2015 2 Pictures
Competitive cyclists like to track their power output, and many use a power meter in order to do so. Those meters mostly take the form of a device that's either added to or built into one crank arm, and they can cost anywhere from around US$1,000 to over $2,000. The Limits power meter, however, simply goes between the pedal and crank of any bike, and is planned to cost less than $400. Read More
— Marine

Submersible photographs WW2 Japanese sub's long-lost airplane hangar

By - April 29, 2015 6 Pictures
Until the 1960s, Japan's three I-400-class subs were the largest submarines ever built. They were so large, in fact, that they could each carry and launch three Aichi M6A Seiran amphibious aircraft. The idea was that the submarines could stealthily bring the planes to within striking distance of US coastal cities, where they could then take off and conduct bombing runs. Now, for the first time since it was scuttled at the end of World War II, one of the sunken subs' aircraft hangars has been photographed. Read More
— Medical

Functioning synthetic blood vessels become the real thing

By - April 29, 2015 3 Pictures
When a vein or artery gets seriously blocked, a common course of action involves replacing it with part of another blood vessel harvested from elsewhere in the patient's body. While 3D-printed and lab-grown blood vessels show promise as alternatives, scientists from the Vienna University of Technology and Vienna Medical University have developed another option – polymer fabric vessels that transform into biological ones, once implanted. Read More

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