Advertisement

Ben Coxworth

Science

First bionic fingertip implant delivers sensational results

Dennis Aabo Sørensen may be missing a hand, but he nonetheless recently felt rough and smooth textures using a fingertip on that arm. The fingertip was electronic, and was surgically hard-wired to nerves in his upper arm. He is reportedly the first person in the world to recognize texture using a bionic fingertip connected to electrodes that were surgically implanted above his stump.Read More

Around The Home

Device turns butter into succulent spray

Butter. It has to be kept cold and hard, yet it's easiest to use when it's warm and soft. Many a slice of fresh bread or toast has fallen victim to this fact. Texas-based inventor Doug Foreman, however, decided to do something about it. His biēm device is loaded with a stick of cold butter, and delivers it onto food in spray form.Read More

Materials

Stretchy squid-inspired skin glows in different colors

Besides having tentacles, squid and octopi are also both known for their color-changing skin. Well, soft-bodied robots may soon also share that attribute, thanks to research being carried out at Cornell University. Led by assistant professor Rob Shepherd, a team of grad students there has developed an electroluminescent rubber "skin" that not only emits light in different colors, but that can also do so while being stretched to more than six times its original length.Read More

Sports

Neck band made to protect the brain

When we think about avoiding concussions, we tend to think of helmets. The problem is, concussions are typically caused by the brain suddenly "sloshing" within the skull, knocking itself against the inside of the cranium. Helmets help reduce the likelihood of that happening by absorbing impact energy, but they're not 100 percent effective – that's why concussions can sometimes occur even without a hit being delivered directly to the head. Help may be on the way, however, in the form of a simple neck band.Read More

Liquid metal runs through new flexible circuits

Before things like touch-sensitive robot skin or prosthetics skin can become commonplace, we first need to develop robust and reliable flexible electronics. Researchers from Switzerland's EPFL research institute have taken a big step toward that goal, by developing circuits that remain functioning while being stretched by up to four times their original length.Read More

    Advertisement
    Advertisement
    Advertisement

    See the stories that matter in your inbox every morning