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Antonio Pasolini

Antonio Pasolini

Brazilian-Italian Antonio Pasolini graduated in journalism in Brazil before heading out to London for an MA in film and television studies. He fell in love with the city and spent 13 years there as a film reviewer before settling back in Brazil. Antonio's passion for green issues - and the outdoors - eventually got the best of him and since 2007 he's been writing about alternative energy, sustainability and new technology.

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— Medical

New test could make ulcer-causing bacteria emit green light in the stomach

By - January 16, 2014 1 Picture
Research carried out by a team of scientists at the University of Southern Denmark literally sheds new light on how a non-invasive technique for the early diagnosis of stomach ulcers could be performed in the future. The findings of the researchers point to a fast, hassle-free method that does not require sample tissues, unlike current testing methods. Read More

Foobler dispenses food and fun for Fido

Dog lovers are always concerned about keeping their furry friends happy, which typically means keeping them well-fed and occupied. That requires some dedication, but now a team of designers has come up with an automated device called Foobler that ticks both these boxes. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Researchers go nuts over plant milk

By - January 8, 2014 1 Picture
The vegetable milk market could be about to get more varied with the findings of a new study carried out in Spain. Using probiotic bacteria obtained from grains and nuts, researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València have come up with a range of fermented products. They hope their findings will increase the choice and the quality of plant milks for people with allergies, lactose intolerance, pregnant women and, of course, vegans. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

New test predicts suicide risk in patients on antidepressants

By - December 18, 2013 1 Picture
The results of a years-long study with patients on antidepressants may help doctors predict one of the most severe side effects those medications can produce: treatment-emergent suicidal ideation (TESI). The condition is estimated to affect between four and 14 percent of patients, who typically present symptoms of TESI in the first weeks of treatment or following dosage adjustments. So far doctors haven’t had indicators to predict which patients are more likely to develop TESI, but a new test based on research carried out by the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich, Germany, could change that. Read More
— Environment

Huge reserves of freshwater lie beneath the ocean floor

By - December 11, 2013 1 Picture
Scientists in Australia have reported the discovery of huge freshwater reserves preserved in aquifers under the world's oceans. The water has remained shielded from seawater thanks to the accumulation of a protective layer of sediment and clay. And it’s not a local phenomenon. Such reserves are to be found under continental shelves off Australia, China, North America and South Africa. Read More
— Around The Home

Bonaverde brews up complete solution for coffee aficionados

By - November 15, 2013 5 Pictures
Coffee is one of the most popular beverages in the world, the fuel that ignites the brain in the morning and keeps us going throughout the day. Some people take their coffee more seriously, and enjoy a more artisanal approach to coffee-making, and not just stirring up a quick instant coffee. It’s for those people that Berlin-based startup Bonaverde has launched a new coffee-making machine that gives coffee lovers total control of the process. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Designers create Leap Motion accessory to interpret sign language

By - November 12, 2013 3 Pictures
Two Portuguese designers based in Sydney have come up with a practical idea for facilitating communication between people when sign language is involved. Catarina Araujo and Sofia Santos’ project, still at the development stage and looking for financial backers, taps Leap Motion technology to create a wearable sign language translator to be worn as a necklace. Read More

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