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Antonio Pasolini

Antonio Pasolini
Brazilian-Italian Antonio Pasolini graduated in journalism in Brazil before heading out to London for an MA in film and television studies. He fell in love with the city and spent 13 years there as a film reviewer before settling back in Brazil. Antonio's passion for green issues - and the outdoors - eventually got the best of him and since 2007 he's been writing about alternative energy, sustainability and new technology.
We've already heard about a biosensor developed in Brazil for detecting pesticide content in food. Now at CE Week, a Seoul-based company called BioSensor Laboratories has presented Penguin, a home-use sensor that detects the presence of antibiotics in animal products. Read More

Portable scanners have been around for a while now, with devices like the Magic Wand and Doxie Go, and they continue to shrink in size. With its new PocketScan, Swiss-based software company Dacuda is now claiming to have developed the world's smallest wireless scanner. Read More

Drivers operating city buses have a tough job ensuring the safety of people on the vehicle as well as those outside it. But technology technology is stepping up to overcome the limitations of rear view mirrors, especially concerning children. A new system being tested in Spain is designed to improve bus safety by issuing a warning when a potential risk to pedestrians is detected so the driver can react accordingly, or bringing the bus to a stop if they don't. Read More
Kicking the cigarette habit is no picnic. It’s a full-on resistance effort against an overwhelming craving. That’s why smokers sometimes need more than will power alone to quit. Now a new device has been developed to add extra ammunition to the fight in the form of the SmartStop, an electronic wearable from U.S.-based Chrono Therapeutics that takes nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to a new level and adds behavioral support, thanks to the possibilities of digital, wireless technology. Read More

Last year, Brazilian startup Kinetics unveiled its NearBytes technology, which has now found a commercial application in the form of the Edgepay point of sale (POS) terminal that allows card-free payments of goods and services using a mobile phone. Read More

Fans of the abstract work of American painter Mark Rothko are in for a treat later this year. Harvard Art Museums has announced a seven-month exhibit called Mark Rothko’s Harvard Murals, set to open in November featuring six panels Rothko made for Harvard in 1961 and 1962, as well as a series of related studies. Besides the opportunity to see works that have not been displayed for more than a decade, visitors will be able to see the murals in a new light, thanks to new digital restoration technology. Read More
There's nothing like snuggling up in a sleeping bag at the end of a long day's hiking. Seattle-based designer Andy Storms is extending that pleasure to man's best friend with the BarkerBag. It's an insulated sleeping bag for dogs that connects to mummy-style sleeping bags via the zipper, allowing both dog and master to share body heat while sleeping in the great outdoors. Read More
Sleep apnea – it’s noisy, unhealthy and dangerous, and it affects up to 24 percent of men 9 percent of women in the US. Night Shift is a new device designed to help people with sleep apnea and snoring issues. These problems are aggravated by sleeping on the back, so the device, which is worn at the back of the neck, vibrates and prompts wearers to move position. Read More
Trondheim in Norway is set to become the stage for some of the most cutting-edge experiments by artists who have turned their focus to the implications of science and technology. Called Meta.Morf – Lost in Transition, the biennale for art and technology is spread across a 30-day program throughout May and includes the work of more than 70 international artists, architects, musicians, writers and researchers from 15 countries. Read More
In Brazil alone, officials estimate that some 475 million animals die from being struck on the nation's roads. That's around 15 animals per second, totaling more than twice the country’s human population. The Centro Brasileiro de Estudos em Ecologia de Estradas (CBEE) is working to reduce those grim statistics with the help of an app called Urubu (vulture in Portuguese), which uses the power of crowd-sourcing to identify roadkill hotspots across the country. Read More
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