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AOC ups the screen size to 22-inches for its latest USB monitor

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January 5, 2012

The e2251Fwu monitor from AOC comes receives both power and signal from a single USB cable

The e2251Fwu monitor from AOC comes receives both power and signal from a single USB cable

AOC, the makers of a range of USB monitors including the16-inch E1649FWU USB monitor, has upped the screen size for its latest USB-powered offering. The new e2251Fwu boasts a 22-inch LED backlit display and receives both power and signal solely through a USB connection. The single USB cable connection is designed to make hooking yourself up with a dual- or multi-monitor setup a simple plug-and-play affair and appeal to those looking to take a second monitor on the road to accompany their laptop.

The e2251Fwu sports Full HD 1920 x 1080 resolution and operates at 60 Hz, with a 5 ms response time, 250 cd/m2 brightness and 20,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio. The unit is also HDCP compatible and comes with a built-in USB 2.0 port for daisy-chaining an additional monitor or other USB devices. AOC hasn't provided the full dimensions of the unit but does reveal it measures 10.6 mm (0.41 in) thick. It also comes with a removable stand that AOC says allows it to be used as a digital photo frame or presentation display.

Powered by a DisplayLink chip, the e2251Fwu is compatible with Linux, Windows XP/Vista/7 and OSX Tiger/Leopard/Lion systems. AOC will be showing the monitor at CES 2012, ahead of its release in February priced at US$199.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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5 Comments

sharp, fairly decent price, well high by 70 bucks, how many watts does it consume?

Bill Bennett
5th January, 2012 @ 09:18 pm PST

With usb to dvi/hdmi adapters there is always struggle when you have disconnect and reconnect when transferring as I have to do; my paltry intel graphics would not allow independent [higher] resolution of extended desktop monitor if connected to hdmi directly (and you can have only one monitor at a time)...I wonder if this one is really as plug and play as promoted.....looks appealing. If yes I am looking not further. Subtract USD 65 for adapter not needed and you have a winner here.

nehopsa
6th January, 2012 @ 12:48 am PST

It looks as this is recycled news: http://www.slipperybrick.com/2011/06/aoc-e2251fwu-usb-powered-lcd-monitor/ ..or http://technosurvivor.com/2011/07/04/aoc-e2251fwu-lcd-monitor-review/.it should have been already on sale since August 2011 (!) Something must have gone wrong...

nehopsa
6th January, 2012 @ 01:00 am PST

I love this concept... please continue. Please add optional , add-on features. === touch screen ( a low rez [16 by 16] and high rez version[ multi-tocuh ] ) === NFC reader === Wireless link ( WiFi or BT or ??? )

then I can use it with my iBOD ( body computer ) which has no large display.

Or give us hackers a way to add options..... even a USB UART or SPI would be cool.

99guspuppet

99gusPuppet
6th January, 2012 @ 08:29 am PST

.....you can wait for this one for ever - if it ever gets produced. In January it was on offer from B&H - always "in two or three weeks' time." Nothing happened. Later about another dozen outlets started offering it (supposedly to arrive by March 16). Nothing happened.

Amazon pulled it out of stock. Nobody ever saw it.

I suspect - for all the high hype and hope - this one is a flop.

Happy for ever waiting.

(And yes...I needed this one. I went with another solution in the meantime (getting a regular Samsung panel.)

nehopsa
11th April, 2012 @ 02:39 pm PDT
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