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Aircraft

NASA's Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (TSS) software enables better management of the spa...

As with all technology, the tools used for air traffic control are always improving. Recently, for example, it was announced that the first remote air traffic control tower would open in Sweden. In a smaller evolution, NASA has provided the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) with software to better manage the spacing between planes.  Read More

A DARPA rendering of the planned XS-1, launching its second-stage rocket

It takes a lot more money and preparation to launch a rocket than to have a plane take off. That's why DARPA (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) first initiated its Experimental Spaceplane (XS-1) program. The idea is that once built, the XS-1 could take off and land like a regular aircraft, but could also deliver satellite payloads into low-Earth orbit while airborne. Today, the agency announced its plans for Phase 1 of the program, which includes awarding contracts for designs of the autonomous spaceplane.  Read More

The A330neo uses the Rolls-Royce Trent 7000 engine

Airbus has announced the launch of the A330-800neo and the A330-900neo, which are the latest variants of the A330 two-engined widebody airliner that entered service in 1994. Airbus says that the A300neo aircraft use the new Rolls-Royce Trent 7000 engine and are the most cost-efficient wide-body aircraft on the market with 14 percent better fuel consumption per passenger seat compared to today's A330.  Read More

Boeing's Space Bins will stow six bags, two more than the current pivot bins installed on ...

Seasoned travelers know the benefits of restricting luggage to carry-on, letting them smugly cruise past the suckers waiting at baggage claim at the end of a flight. But with the number of people going carry-on only, finding space in the overhead compartments can be a hassle. Boeing's new Space Bins overcome this problem, with each storing two more bags than the current bins.  Read More

A light-equipped UAV moves to maintain the desired lighting on the model

As any professional photographer knows, setting up lights can be a hassle. This is often the case in the studio, but especially when shooting on location. Before too long, however, it may be possible to use hovering autonomous drones as light sources. In fact, that's just what a team from MIT and Cornell University has already done. Their system not only does away with light stands, but the light-equipped aircraft automatically moves to compensate for movements of the model or photographer.  Read More

The public début of the F-35 was cancelled due to a technical issue (Photo: Lockheed Marti...

There are going to be some disappointed aeronautical fans this weekend at the Royal International Air Tattoo in Gloucestershire, UK. The F-35B Lightning II fighter will not be making its scheduled international public début due to the grounding of the entire F-35 fleet after a runway incident in Florida.  Read More

The AVX Aircraft concept has coaxial rotors, ducted fans and a top speed of over 270 mph (...

As one of the contenders in the race to win a $US100 billion contract from the US government for the Army’s next generation of attack helicopter, AVX Aircraft Company has conceived a futuristic machine kitted out with coaxial rotors, ducted fans and a retractable undercarriage that could hit speeds of over 270 mph (435 km/h).  Read More

According to BAE Systems researchers, military aircraft could be fitted with 3D printers t...

Requests for backup might usually trigger a halt in a military operations, but two fast-moving technologies could one day combine to deliver much-needed reinforcements exactly where they're needed. Such is the vision of defense firm BAE Systems, which sees aircraft having advanced onboard 3D printers that are capable of producing UAVs for wide-ranging military purposes.  Read More

The virtual cockpit display widens the pilot's field of vision

Imagine showing up at the airport to catch your flight, looking at your plane, and noticing that instead of windows, the cockpit is now a smooth cone of aluminum. It may seem like the worst case of quality control in history, but Airbus argues that this could be the airliner of the future. In a new US patent application, the EU aircraft consortium outlines a new cockpit design that replaces the traditional cockpit with one that uses 3D view screens instead of conventional windows.  Read More

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