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Air ionizing rangehood sanitizes the air while you cook

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May 29, 2012

Snaidero's 'green' rangehood doesn't need any exhaust pipes, opening up new possibilities ...

Snaidero's 'green' rangehood doesn't need any exhaust pipes, opening up new possibilities for kitchen design

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Italian kitchen-maker Snaidero has teamed up with Italian appliance maker Falmec to create an island range hood that boasts air-ionizing technology. Instead of simply acting as an exhaust fan to draw away cooking fumes, the new “green” hood eliminates odors and sanitizes the air in the same way as an air ionizing air purifier.

By applying a bipolar electric field to the flow of air generated by the extractor hood, Snaidero says its new Greenhood attracts volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and neutralizes them by turning them into water and CO2. The rangehood also deactivates viruses, bacteria and allergens by breaking down their external membranes and neutralizes mildew, fungi and spores and tobacco smoke, and eliminates particulates from the air.

Snaidero's 'green' rangehood sanitizes the air using air ionizing technology

Snaidero says the rangehood can be used to sanitize the air even when not cooking, with a sensor embedded in the extractor hood detecting the air quality, which is indicated by a leaf symbol on the unit’s push button panel that will turn from yellow to green as the air quality improves.

But one of the biggest advantages of the Greenhood is that it eliminates the need for exhaust pipes to direct the extracted air outside, as is the case with traditional range hoods. As well as potentially making it cheaper to install in existing buildings and opening up kitchen design possibilities, it means that hot indoor air in summer and air conditioned air in winter isn’t simply funneled outside.

Source: Snaidero

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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3 Comments

What about condensation in some kitchens. The valuable better air is immediately lost, the system could perhaps do with a an easy to use floor plan which allows you to direct the good air to any room in the house or in all upstairs, rather then a distribution around one area.

Richardf
29th May, 2012 @ 10:58 am PDT

Last I checked years ago, electronic ionizer has a nasty by-product after a year or so of use. They create a lot of ozone. The only ionizers that seem to work are water based. After all, nature does it best when water splashes and creates negative ions.

Nicolas Zart
29th May, 2012 @ 12:36 pm PDT

Years of research and testing have found that a blend of naturally-occurring minerals possessing unique electrical properties; this in turn has created a new product. The technology in Air-ReNu, produces a small electronic field consisting primarily of electrons. These airborne electrons ionize the suspended gases and liquid cation molecules that carry the toxins and odors throughout the room, turning them into anions. Air-ReNu only has to be applied one time and is a permanent solution to managing indoor air quality and eliminating odors.

Zippo
15th December, 2012 @ 07:18 am PST
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