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3D Printing

ESA successfully tests 3D printed thruster

The European Space Agency (ESA) has successfully test fired a 3D printed platinum alloy thruster combustion chamber and nozzle. The world first test is further evidence that the 3D printing approach is a viable one for the aerospace industry, with the potential to cut costs by streamlining production methods and adding a greater level of flexibility in terms of supply and demand construction.Read More

3D-printed objects created entirely from wood cellulose

The 3D printing revolution brings with it a harmful side effect: the special inks that it uses are derived (for the most part) from environmentally-unfriendly processes involving fossil fuels and toxic byproducts. But now scientists at Chalmers University of Technology have succeeded in using cellulose – the most abundant organic compound on the planet – in a 3D printer. They were also able to create electrically-conductive materials by adding carbon nanotubes.Read More

3D-printed flutes hit the right notes

Researchers at Australia's University of Wollongong (UOW) have created a number of 3D-printed custom flutes that can play microtonal tunings otherwise unachievable with standard flutes, thus opening up a whole new series of tones to flute players. The same research could also lead to instruments which are easier for disabled people to play.

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MX3D gets go-ahead for 3D-printed bridge in Amsterdam

Gizmag has covered a wealth of remarkable architectural projects involving 3D printing – including a backyard castle, a number of small homes and a room with 260 million surfaces – but a project in Amsterdam, Netherlands, is set to be particularly impressive. 3D printing R&D firm MX3D is planning to print a bridge across a canal. It is hoped that the robots used will print their own supports and gradually move across the water, creating the bridge as they go.Read More

3D-printed materials that change texture on demand

When it comes to creating surfaces, it's a simple task to either make ones that are smooth or ones that are bumpy. But now researchers at MIT have created one that can be both. The 3D-printed surface they have created can be either smooth, bumpy, ridged, or channeled and can dynamically change texture through the application of pressure.Read More

Review

CSIRO's Lab 22: Kickstarting a 3D printing revolution in titanium

Australia is wasting billions of dollars of potential value by shipping its world-beating titanium reserves out of the country as raw ore. That's why CSIRO's Lab 22 is making millions of dollars' worth of 3D printing facilities available to Australian businesses in an effort to kick-start a local additive manufacturing revolution that could add billions of dollars' worth of value to the country's raw titanium exports.Read More

TE Connectivity 3D-prints a functioning motorcycle

Unveiled at Rapid 2015 in Long Beach, California, TE Connectivity’s exercise in 3D printing demonstrates the ability to design a motorcycle on a computer, print it in plastic, add tires and a motor, then take it for a spin. While the result may not quite be ready to hit the highway, the concept is still nothing short of exciting.

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3D-printed scaffolds may make for improved diabetes treatment

One way sufferers of type 1 diabetes may compensate for a lack of insulin is through an experimental procedure called pancreatic islet transplantation, a process that sees clusters of cells transplanted from the pancreas of a healthy donor. A side effect of this is the need for ongoing doses of immunosuppressant drugs to stop the body attacking the foreign cells. But a new approach that sees these clusters protected by a 3D-printed scaffold is showing promise as a delivery technique, potentially pointing to less painstaking ways to manage the condition. Read More

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