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3D Printing

Water-soluble filament makes creating "impossible" 3D prints easier

3D printing has made some impressive strides in the past couple of years, allowing makers to create a wide variety of fantastic and unique designs. Despite the overall success, many prints still have limitations when it comes to structure, shape, or articulation. But 3D Systems is about to change all of that with the latest Infinity Rinse-away water-soluble support material.Read More

World's first 3D-printed supercar aimed at shaking up the auto industry

Automobiles have made great strides in recent years in becoming cleaner and greener, but according to Divergent Microfactories, they still have miles to go. The problem, as the company sees it, is that while powertrains have become cleaner thanks to the use of alternative energy sources like battery power and fuel cells, manufacturing is dirtier than ever. The start-up puts forth a solution in the all-new Blade, which it calls "the world's first 3D-printed supercar."Read More

Synthetic rhinoceros horn could help save real rhinos

When asked to name an endangered species, rhinos are probably one of the first animals to come to most peoples' minds. In both Africa and Asia, poaching is causing populations to plummet, due mainly to demand for rhino horn as an ingredient in traditional Asian medicine – whether or not it actually has any medicinal value is another question altogether. In any case, San Francisco-based biotech startup Pembient is developing what it hopes could be a solution: inexpensive bioengineered rhino horn, which could out-compete the genuine item.Read More

Daihatsu and Stratasys combine for user-customized Copens

Japan's oldest carmaker, Daihatsu and American 3D printing company Stratasys have come together to let Daihatsu Copen owners design their own car panels and have them made to order. Utilizing the unique changeable panel system on the open sports car, special panels will accept costumer designed elements with new shapes and textures. This personalized driving experience was recently proven by Designers Kota Nezu and Junjie Sun on their “Effect Skins” project and Gizmag went along to the 2015 Design Engineering & Manufacturing Solutions Expo to see the results.Read More

World's first 3D-printed office building to go up layer by layer in Dubai

Already home to numerous architectural wonders, including the world's tallest building, Dubai is set to add the world's first 3D-printed office building to its streets. It will be printed layer by layer by a 3D printer standing 20 ft (6 m) tall, with the layers to be assembled on site to produce a building covering approximately 2,000 sq ft (186 sq m) in a process that is set to take a matter of weeks.

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Wonder-ink could soon let you 3D print objects out of stretchy graphene

A new 3D-printing ink being developed at Northwestern University could soon make it possible to build objects which are made of graphene for 60 percent of their volume and 75 percent of their weight. This unprecedentedly high graphene composition means that the oft-praised electric and mechanical properties of graphene might soon find their way into all kinds of macroscopic 3D-printed creations, with important consequences for the electronics and biomedical fields (among many others).Read More

Palm-sized 3DSimo Mini draws, cuts, solders and burns

The creators of the 3D-drawing pen known as the 3DSimo are back again, and this time they have a new device called the 3DSimo Mini. The device is smaller, of course, but the team is also expanding the functionality of it by adding a foam cutter, a burn tool, and a soldering iron. These functions go along with the return of the 3D drawing functionality from the previous model.Read More

ESA successfully tests 3D printed thruster

The European Space Agency (ESA) has successfully test fired a 3D printed platinum alloy thruster combustion chamber and nozzle. The world first test is further evidence that the 3D printing approach is a viable one for the aerospace industry, with the potential to cut costs by streamlining production methods and adding a greater level of flexibility in terms of supply and demand construction.Read More

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