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3D Printing

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Autodesk's CEO of today on the machines that will be making things tomorrow

Carl Bass has been making stuff for forty years, from wooden furniture and granite benches to makeshift rafts built from discarded navy pontoons. These days, outside of his day job running design software company Autodesk, he keeps right on making stuff. Like an autonomous electric go-kart powered by transplanted drone hardware (currently under repair). Last week, Gizmag checked into Autodesk's pop-up gallery in Tokyo, where Bass offered his thoughts on the mildly unsettling notion that sometimes a computer's ideas might be better than ours, an emerging concept known as generative design.

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World’s first jet-powered, 3D-printed UAV debuts at Dubai Airshow

3D printing just hit another benchmark, with the recent announcement by Aurora Flight Sciences and Stratasys Ltd that they have developed a 3D-printed, jet-powered unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with the ability to reach speeds of up to 150 mph (241 km/h). Unveiled at this week’s Dubai Airshow, it is reportedly the largest and most complex UAV ever created using 3D printing.

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New 3D-printing tech set to enable patient-specific medical devices

Most medical devices come in standard sizes, but people – as you've probably noticed – vary widely in their shape and size. Sick or premature babies especially can run afoul of this system, as their tiny bodies leave much less room for error in inserting or attaching devices at the correct spot. But in the near future all biomedical equipment may be 3D printed at precise dimensions to suit each patient.

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Wacky tape gun produces life-size CAD-assisted wireframe models

Using a handheld packing tape dispenser gun that has been modified to fold, extrude, and cut tape into tubes, a team of researchers from the Hasso-Plattner-Insitut (HPI) at the University of Potsdam has created a method of transferring computer-generated wire-frames to the real world. Dubbed the "Protopiper" by its creators, the device is not only capable of producing full-size outline objects, it is also able to produce hinges, bearings, and axles to give them opening doors, drawers, and movement just like the real things.

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3D printed teeth kill bacteria

Creating replacement parts for various bits of the human body is one of the many areas in which 3D printing has huge potential. Dental implants are on that list, too, and if new research out of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands comes to fruition, 3D-printed replacement teeth could come with the added bonus of being able to destroy 99 percent of bacteria that they come into contact with.

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Glowforge 3D laser printing juggernaut enters life after crowdfunding

After a record shattering Kickstarter campaign that netted the company more than $27.9M in purchases in less than thirty days, Glowforge is gearing up to bring its novel take on three-dimensional fabrication to the masses. Gizmag spoke to Glowforge founder and CEO, Dan Shapiro, about the market, the future, and how pancakes relate to when the product will ship.

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Scientists use 3D printer to create synthetic hair

You know how when you're using a hot glue gun, and you get all those little strands of glue forming when you pull the gun back from the surface being glued? Well, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used that same principle to create 3D-printed "hair." The discovery could allow for the creation of 3D-printed devices containing brushes or bristles … or even for making troll dolls.

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Researchers create a 3D-printed vehicle that can power a 3D-printed home (and vice versa)

A research team from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ONRL) has created a new model for how we can connect the way we power our homes and vehicles. Dubbed AMIE (Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy), the platform features special technology that allows a bi-directional flow of energy between a dwelling and a vehicle. In other words, the house can fuel the car and the car can fuel the house. What's more, ORNL used 3D printing technology to build the dwelling and the vehicle, before successfully trialing the new energy system.

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