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3D Printing

Scientists create "active" 3D printer plastic

3D printers are capable of producing items that can perform all sorts of functions … when power is applied to those items, that is. In the case of commercial-grade printers, however, the build material itself is typically an inert thermoplastic or resin. Researchers at Washington DC's American University have set out to change that, by printing a sponge-like matrix that eliminates pollutants. It's reportedly the first time that a commercial 3D printer has created an object that has active chemistry.Read More

3D-printed bionic hand could soon be yours – if you need it

When we first reported on the relatively cheap 3D-printed robotic hand made by Youbionic back in 2014, we indicated that the device was only a prototype and that the makers were looking for funding to bring it to market. Well, apparently they've gotten the funding, because Youbionic is now taking pre-orders for the device.Read More

3D printer uses light from a smartphone screen to harden creations

Over the past few years, 3D printers have become more versatile and accessible to the average consumer. Many models are easy to use, some of which can occupy a minimal amount of space with footprints hardly larger than a sheet of paper. But the latest 3D printer takes portability to the next level, given that millions already own half of the required hardware. OLO is designed to let users create 3D prints by using the light from a smartphone screen.Read More

Smiling student uses 3D printer to make plastic braces on the cheap

Orthodontics don't tend to mix too well with self-sustaining undergraduate students, whose budgetary extravagances might extend to the odd double serving of instant noodles. But faced with crooked teeth and access to a 3D printer, digital design student Amos Dudley has taken matters into his own hands, straightening out his smile with a set of DIY plastic aligners. Read More

Eavesdropping on 3D printers allows reverse engineering of sensitive designs

3D printers have opened up all kinds of possibilities when it comes to turning digital blueprints into real word objects, but might they also enable new ways to pilfer intellectual property? Amid all that mechanical whirring, these machines emit acoustic signals that give away the motion of the nozzle, new research has found. And by discreetly recording these sounds, scientists say it is possible for sneaky characters to deduce exact design details and reverse engineer printed objects at a later date.Read More

3D-printed braille maps to show students the way

Finding your way around an unfamiliar building can be tricky for anyone, but its far more difficult for people with visual impairments. A pair of researchers at Rutgers University School of Engineering came up with a way of improving the situation for students at a training center for the blind and visually impaired in New Brunswick by 3D-printing detailed braille maps of the facility.Read More

Review

Review: Ultimaker 2 Extended 3D printer

In a crowded field, the Ultimaker 2 Extended is one of the highest resolution desktop 3D printers available. It's larger footprint means it can also print larger, more complex projects than many of its brethren. Gizmag tried out this jumbo making machine to size up what it can do.Read More

Used snack bags can now be recycled into whatever you design

Typical recycling involves sending off your old cans, bottles, boxes and papers to be re-purposed somewhere far away, sight unseen. Terracycle and 3D Brooklyn allow you to determine what gets made from recycled materials, thanks to a process that turns used chip and snack bags into plastic filament for use in 3D printing.Read More

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