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2013 SRT Viper set for production

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November 21, 2012

The brand new look and feel for the 2013 SRT Viper

The brand new look and feel for the 2013 SRT Viper

Image Gallery (50 images)

It was only a few short months ago that Chrysler showed off the 2013 SRT Viper at the New York Motor Show. The brand new model boasts some serious refinements over previous iterations of the 10-cylinder beast, with the body style and interior rebuilt from the ground up. The muscle-car is now set to enter production, and the company has released some new performance numbers and an extensive photo gallery to mark the occasion.

The new numbers for the SRT Viper claim a top speed of 206 mph and a 0-60 mph time in the low 3-second range. Chrysler also claims it can also run the quarter-mile in the mid 11-second range and its 60-0 mph brake distance is 106 feet (32.3 m).

The hood of the 2013 SRT Viper

The new Viper comes in two different models. The standard SRT Viper starts at US$99,390. The GTS version that starts at $122,390.

The SRT Viper and SRT Viper GTS

Check out the full gallery for a closer look ... and for a complete rundown of every fine detail jump to our previous article on the SRT Viper.

Source: Chrysler via Inside Line

About the Author
Dave LeClair Dave is an avid follower of all things mobile, gaming, and any kind of new technology he can get his hands on. Ever since he first played an NES as a child, he's been an absolute tech and gaming junkie.   All articles by Dave LeClair
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6 Comments

$122,390 - $7,000 cost to build = $115.390 not used in your local community.

Robert DuBois
22nd November, 2012 @ 04:06 am PST

SRT vs GT500

Let the testing begin!

Captain Danger
22nd November, 2012 @ 05:36 am PST

Great looking classic design. But does the world really need another 200 mph gas-hog on the highways? Yes, I know -- "The world doesn't need it, but Chrysler shareholders and the oil companies do."

If it ran on compressed air, was half that fast, and half that expensive, I would definitely want one, though it wouldn't sound as sweet.

Photon
22nd November, 2012 @ 01:06 pm PST

If it ran on compressed air, was half as fast and half as expensive it would be impractical and/or it would define new laws of physics as yet unknown.

Do we need it? That is like asking if we need yet another print reproduction of the Mona Lisa. Not that I'm comparing the cultural impact of the SRT to the Mona Lisa, but I am comparing the relative usefulness. As a society and culture we often need demonstrations of capability and design as much as purely pragmatic items.

Are super cars art? Not entirely, because they do have some utility to them that is not purely aesthetic / cultural. But to poo-poo a limited edition, short run car because it is not absolutely utilitarian is wrong, I think.

What I find funny is that American car manufacturers can't come up with a compelling new design language but have to rely on the 1950's-60's designs to make good looking cars.

Also, being in Australia I'll likely never see one of these let alone be able to afford one. $120,000 USD = $115,000 AUD in direct conversion, but after the Australia tax we'd be looking at closer to $250,000 - $300,000 because we in Australia are just that stupid.

Scion
22nd November, 2012 @ 06:26 pm PST

Gizmag, a celebration of all that's new in technology and gizmos. However, there's nothing new about steel vehicles with internal combustion engines. In fact this is serious dinosaur technology and a waste of progressive journalistic space. I can appreciate you being a revhead, me too, but this isn't the performance vehicle of the future is it?

apprenticeearthwiz
22nd November, 2012 @ 10:58 pm PST

I think the Ford GT500 is more inline with a Camaro and not really in the same league or price range as the Viper. The 2010 Viper ACR has a 7:12 Nurburgring time for instance.

At 122k the viper will compete against cars like the Corvette ZR1 and Nissan GT-R.

The 2013 GT-R (95k) is supposed to be able to run a 10.8 second 1/4 mile. The 2011 GT-R had a 7:24 Nurburgring time and the 2012 Corvette Z06 (75k) runs it in 7:22.

The reason these cars matter is because they are faster than significantly more expensive cars. It isn't unusual for cars from Porche, Pagani, Ferrari, Koenigsegg that cost a million dollars to run the Nurburgring in the 7:30 range.

75k or a 100k for a car doesn't seem that crazy when you consider how many middle class families are driving around mid 40k SUV's and sedans. You could pick up a used 2010 Z06 for $55k which would spank a Pagani Zonda around the ring. That is the significance.

Daishi
25th November, 2012 @ 01:42 am PST
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